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Tuesday, October 16
 

9:00am

Conference Opening and Welcome
Tuesday October 16, 2012 9:00am - 9:30am
C300

9:30am

Keynote - Ecologies of Yearning and the Future of Open Education

Ecologies of Yearning and the Future of Open Education

Massive Open Online Courses now enroll millions of students. MOOCs and their implications nearly toppled a president at a major research university last spring, and disruptions like these are sure to continue. Yet these extraordinary developments do not by themselves constitute success for open education. As we seek to move “beyond content,” there are principles we have not yet discovered or fully articulated, conceptual frameworks we must revisit, and challenges we must acknowledge and address. By synthesizing, or at least mashing up, Seymour Papert’s “yearning for megachange” and Gregory Bateson’s “ecologies of mind,” I will suggest some ways the open education movements might avoid reinforcing the worst models of computer-aided instruction, and instead lead the way toward deep, meaningful, and enduring educational reform.


Speakers

Tuesday October 16, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
C300

10:30am

Break
Tuesday October 16, 2012 10:30am - 11:00am
Lobby

11:00am

Open Education: Still a Chasm to Cross

Limited access to higher education is one the greatest challenges faced by students today. The recent economic slowdown coupled with the increasing costs of education has forced educational institutions of all levels to reevaluate the way they use their resources. As educators begin to explore ways to cut costs, they are beginning to discover that Open Educational Resources (OER) have the potential to not only drive down cost of education but also to increase its flexibility.

However, significant barriers remain: procuring and organizing OER resources can be time consuming, quality standards are inconsistent, few OER platforms inter-operate, and local awareness of OER remains low in the broader education space.

This panel will overview the current “chasm” that OER has to cross in order to reach mainstream acceptance. The panel provides the unique perspectives of an OER publisher (David Harris, Editor-in-Chief Connexions and OpenStax College), a faculty member (Prof. Marc T. Sher of the College of William and Mary), and a for-profit education service provider (Dr. Jamie Caras, President of Sapling Learning). The panel will discuss the following questions:

  1. What is the awareness of OER on college campuses today?
  2. What are the content/development requirements to achieve wide-scale adoption of OER?
  3. How do OER advocates effectively reach the decision makers?
  4. How can social media enable broader adoption of OER?
  5. What new cooperative ecosystem is required for financial sustainability?
  6. How do we develop common standards for OER?
  7. Can OER only compete when it’s available anywhere, at any time, on any device?


A diverse array current OER examples will be introduced to demonstrate current attempts to cross the chasm, including OpenStax College (an initiative of Connexions), Flatworld Knowlege, The Orange Grove, OCWC, stacked credential efforts, and emerging referatories. The session will conclude with a strategy discussion on ideas to propel OER into the mainstream.



Tuesday October 16, 2012 11:00am - 11:45am
C485

11:00am

The Need for Open Business Models

A presentation and brainstorm about how and where for profit companies can and should fit into the open educational landscape. This will include details of the experience of Boundless Learning, a for profit, venture-backed company that is building products that help students learn and study better, while saving money.

Following an initial presentation and overview, the focus will be a work session to think through challenges, models, and specific companies.


Speakers

Tuesday October 16, 2012 11:00am - 11:45am
C485

11:00am

High-Touch & High-Tech: Best Practices in Open and Online Teaching

Come and see how Open High School leverages Open Education and technology's promise to improve education while simultaneously providing a rich, rewarding, highly personalized environment through shepherding, collaboration and modifying curriculum to meet student needs. Learn more about best practices in online teaching; see how high-tech meets high-touch and how implementing these practices at your school can produce outstanding results in meeting the individual needs of students.


Speakers
avatar for Sarah Morse Weston

Sarah Morse Weston

Director of Technology and OER, Mountain Heights Academy
Sarah Weston has worked in secondary education for 18 years, as a teacher, administrator, and curriculum designer. She has built 17 semester courses using Open Educational Resources (OER) and currently oversees all course development and teacher training on building with OER. Sarah was awarded Utah Charter Educator of the Year in 2010; the first online educator to receive the award. Sarah is a regular presenter at national conferences... Read More →


Tuesday October 16, 2012 11:00am - 11:45am
C680 - HSBC Hall

11:00am

OER Essentials: How to Build, Adapt & Supplement Online/Hybrid Courses Using OER

Open High School of Utah has been creating and using OER as the basis of their courses for the past four years. With over 48 developed courses under their belt, the Open High School has fine-tuned the process of identifying, structuring and creating a dynamic and engaging curriculum using Open Educational Resources. This session will focus on best practices in OER, providing both new and experienced online educators with essential steps and use-case examples on using OER in their classrooms.


Speakers
avatar for Sarah Morse Weston

Sarah Morse Weston

Director of Technology and OER, Mountain Heights Academy
Sarah Weston has worked in secondary education for 18 years, as a teacher, administrator, and curriculum designer. She has built 17 semester courses using Open Educational Resources (OER) and currently oversees all course development and teacher training on building with OER. Sarah was awarded Utah Charter Educator of the Year in 2010; the first online educator to receive the award. Sarah is a regular presenter at national conferences... Read More →


Tuesday October 16, 2012 11:00am - 11:45am
C680 - HSBC Hall

11:00am

UNESCO Chairs in OER report on activities

The UNESCO and UNESCO/COL Chairs will report on their activities:

1 Global OER Graduate Network (priority at PhD level) (coordinator OUNL)
2 OER Knowledge Cloud (coordinator AU)

and two enabling Lines of Action:
3 Global OER Map of national and institutional OER initiatives
4 Global balance in the network of UNESCO Chairs in OER, connected in a UNESCO UNITWIN network

These four Lines of Action will contribute through specific activities to the overall Plan of Action for the next few years.

1 Global OER Graduate Network

  • Umbrella for PhD (& Master) research on OER linked to different disciplines;
  • Addressing fundaments, design, applications, practice, context, evaluation & monitoring;
  • Partner universities around the world;
  • PhD candidates (& Master students) - both full-time and part-time;
  • Joint supervision, (home university plus 1-2 partner universities in other countries);
  • Learning network / community of practice of PhD candidates (& Master students) and supervisors;
  • Shared quality standards/research guidelines;
  • Shared online training facilities/courses;
  • Expand OER research base, develop/explore new knowledge and increase evidence for practice;
  • Publications, presentations, reports, theses


2 OER Knowledge Cloud

  • Overall (free) provision of knowledge about OER
  • Specific emphasis on maintenance of the Cloud
  • The Graduate Network will be an important provider
  • Including books, papers, reports
  • Freely available for replication, reproduction in different repositories and/or learning environments.


3 Global OER Map

  • A global map of national and institutional initiatives is intended to provide a bird’s eye view of the OER movement;
  • describing the scale of the movement and the growth of initiatives over time


4 Global balance in the network of UNESCO Chairs in OER

  • With one UNESCO Chair in OER in Europe and one in North America it is essential to establish UNESCO Chairs in OER at least on the other continents;
  • This UNESCO Chair configuration will naturally become a UNESCO UNITWIN network in OER;
  • With each new UNESCO Chair in OER coming in, the Plan of Action shall be updated

Speakers
avatar for Rory McGreal

Rory McGreal

Professor, Athabasca University
I am the UNESCO/Commonwealth of Learning/International Council for Open and Distance Education Chair in Open Educational Resources and the director of TEKRI at Athabasca University


Tuesday October 16, 2012 11:00am - 11:45am
C400

11:50am

Making Open Courseware Count

Since 2008, the Saylor Foundation’s focus has been on our free education initiative, through which we’ve built over 200 self-paced, automated college-level courses, made freely available via www.saylor.org. After flying under the radar for three years in order to focus on curating freely available educational resources and developing courses around them, Saylor Foundation staff have ramped up marketing and communications efforts in order to notify knowledge-hungry individuals of our free courseware.
 
Over the past year, we’ve found that our courseware attracts a diverse student constituency. Students hail from a sprawling array of socio-economic backgrounds, cultures, and geographic locations. Some cannot afford traditional educational opportunities. Others find themselves in war-ridden countries like Afghanistan, where it is too dangerous to venture to a brick-and-mortar institution. Still others have rejected traditional schooling models, or decided to pursue academic interests late in life, or chosen to use Saylor.org for remedial purposes.

Our free education model – like others in the open education community – has succeeded in increasing access to education around the world and creating an open environment in which students can learn for free. However, students are largely unable to translate their open courseware experiences into credentials that enjoy currency within the workforce, the job market, or the traditional academic community. In response, we are designing partnerships and strategies that will enable students to obtain formal credit for their work here at Saylor. This talk will present these approaches to the Open Educational Community in the hopes of participating in a dialogue about how we can “make open count” or -- better yet -- spurring the actions and partnerships that will affect this change.


Speakers
avatar for Alana Harrington

Alana Harrington

Hi all. I am the Program Director for the Free Education Initiative at The Saylor Foundation (www.saylor.org). We're all excited for the conference and look forward to meeting you all. Please feel free to visit our site www.saylor.org-- we'll share a bit much more about our project and process at our presentation entitled "Connecting the Dots." See you in Park City!


Tuesday October 16, 2012 11:50am - 12:35pm
C485

11:50am

OER and Alternative Certification Models

OER and Alternative Certification Models: Blurring Boundaries Between Formal and Informal Learning

Through the advent of OER and open access, the education arena is witnessing the rise of new models for supporting and recognizing learning for students and lifelong learners alike. From Open High School Utah, to P2PU, to MITx, to the numerous open badge systems under development—these models are blurring the boundaries between formal and informal learning, and making inroads into traditional pathways for certifying learning. This session will present an analysis of the historical trajectory of these alternative certification models—in terms of where they have been, where they are headed, and their impact (current and future) on formal education as an institution. The session will close with a facilitated discussion of the potential of these new models for supporting learning in innovative ways.


Speakers
CJ

Cynthia Jimes

Director of Research and Learning, ISKME


Tuesday October 16, 2012 11:50am - 12:35pm
C485

11:50am

Open Academics Textbook Catalog

The increasing cost of higher education threatens to limit access to education for many students. One significant higher education cost is textbooks. In the last 30 years,textbook prices have risen almost four times the rate of inflation. Students pay an average of $1,168 per year on textbooks, and seven out of ten students report that they hadn’t bought a required text due to cost.

Reducing textbook costs could improve college access and affordability, while not impacting the resources of institutions of higher education.
Open textbooks are textbooks licensed with a Creative Commons or similar open license. Open textbooks provide more affordable textbook options for students, and allow faculty to create more customized textbooks for their courses.

Yet the faculty adoption of open textbooks is not yet widespread. To increase adoption, two main barriers must be overcome:

(1) Open textbooks are hard to find.

Open textbooks are located in various locations on the Internet. Many are located in large online libraries of open education resources (OER). These libraries are comprehensive, including open textbooks, but also many, many other OERs. This abundance of resources can make it challenging for faculty to find full textbooks.

(2) It’s difficult to know which open textbooks are quality.

Determining the quality of any educational resource can be challenging, and open textbooks are no different. Commercial textbook companies often capture and advertise recommendations from faculty when marketing a textbook, giving it credibility. But open textbook authors are often not as skilled or motivated to brag about the quality of their textbook.

These barriers can be significantly addressed through the creation of an online, peer-reviewed open textbook catalog. This searchable catalog will contain only complete open textbooks, and include textbook reviews from faculty.

Working with the national Student PIRG, the University of Minnesota’s College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) has developed such a catalog.

The online catalog is a first of its kind and has become a resource for finding quality open textbooks. It includes pointers to textbooks that are openly licensed complete textbooks. Faculty looking for an open textbook can read peer-reviews of texts and be directed to the texts themselves for their own evaluation. When a faculty member adopts a textbook from the catalog, students will have options to choose a free electronic version of the textbook, or purchase a low-cost print version (the majority of students prefer printed textbooks to electronic).
This catalog has uniquely addressed the barriers of faculty adoption of open textbooks by providing a single place for faculty to find and determine the quality of open textbooks. In this presentation, we will report on the number of University of Minnesota faculty and students who have benefited from this catalog and describe the potential cost savings seen by students. In addition, we will report on metrics of use of the catalog by those outside the University of Minnesota.


Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for David Ernst

David Ernst

Executive Director, Open Textbook Network
Dr. David Ernst is graduate faculty, Chief Information Officer, and Director of the Center for Open Education in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota. David is also the Executive Director of the Open Textbook Network, which works to improve higher education access, affordability, and academic success for all students through the use of open textbooks. David created and manages the Open Textbook Library... Read More →


Tuesday October 16, 2012 11:50am - 12:35pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

11:50am

Share Everywhere: A multi-project collaboration to make it easy to create and share content with legs.

The OERPub team is making it easy to create and edit OER and expanding the options for publishing and sharing content. Last year we created an importer that takes content from Word, Google Docs, and blogs and makes it remixable by unifying the formats. We then used simple software hooks to publish the content to repositories like Connexions.

This year are adding an easy-to-use, open source document editor so that authors can create content from scratch or edit the content they imported. We are incorporating research-driven principles so that authors used to Word and Google Docs can still create beautiful remixable content. Rather than asking authors to learn complicated markup, we are using authors’ natural actions to provide just-in-time semantic choices and convenient templates for editing. 

We are expanding the options for sharing OER (while still keeping it remixable) by making it possible to publish to institutional repositories like DSpace as well as other projects that provide structured publishing like Connexions, Siyavula, Booktype and Open University. The underlying editor is built collaboratively and intended for use by many projects.

In this presentation we will unveil our new collaboratively created open-source editor for OER and show how it can be used to create, edit, and publish content to OER libraries. We will highlight the research principles that were used to guide the editing experience and also show how other projects have participated with us and how new projects can get involved and incorporate the editor and adapt it for their content. The talk will be mostly non-technical focusing on the how and why, with pointers to the technical meat for reference.



Tuesday October 16, 2012 11:50am - 12:35pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

11:50am

Developing Foreign Language Courses for the Open Course Library Project

Three South Puget Sound Community College faculty collaborated to produce the Spanish and French first-year series for Phase 2 of Washington State’s Open Course Library (OCL) project. This presentation focuses on two parts: first, the impact that having access to high-quality open resources had on the success of the development process; second, the cultural immersion projects that they put together as part of the course series. Both of these highlight the importance of high-quality OERs in moving toward an open education model.

The French series had access to a high-quality, open-source textbook (Français Interactif), while Spanish did not. Having a textbook had a significant impact on the course development process: the work of the French team largely consisted in indexing the textbook, while the Spanish team was tasked with scouring a multitude of OERs in search of material and ultimately creating content (Learning Activities, Assessments, etc). This presentation uses both teams’ experiences as a case study highlighting the central role that high-quality OERs play in the development of open educational resources.

As part of this project, the French and Spanish teams collaborated to develop a series of cultural immersion projects using a variety of tools. The goals of the immersion projects are to encourage students to explore the contexts in which their target language is spoken; how language affects culture, and vice-versa; the impact colonialism has had on colonized and colonizing cultures; and finally (and perhaps most importantly), the projects are designed to help students recognize their own cultural lenses as well as their place in a globalized society.



Tuesday October 16, 2012 11:50am - 12:35pm
C400

11:50am

The Great Beyond with Open English Language Education Resources

The goal of this research is two-fold. First and foremost, an examination of the digital infrastructure that enables the effective linking of both open and proprietary content for the development of open tools and resources for English language education will be presented for discussion. This will include an extensive exploration of the re-use and re-purposing of different types of English language content for the development of open English language teaching and learning resources, as seen with the Flexible Language Acquisition (FLAX) project based at the University of Waikato in New Zealand. For example, re-purposed peer-reviewed research content for the development of English language open educational resources (OER) derived from language collections such as the British National Corpus and Open Access journal publications. Further collections include the British Academic Written English corpus of university student-generated texts as well as crowd-sourced linguistic content from Wikipedia.

Second, an opening landscape in English language education will be presented for further discussion, concerning the projects, practices and people engaged in promoting openness in this field. This open landscape in English language education resources will be defined against the backdrop of an international English language teaching resources industry, which has long been dominated by big-brand proprietary publications. New pathways for engaging with Open Access publishers along with an exploration of new publishing models that are afforded by digital technologies and open licensing standards will also be presented. Insights from collaborations between OER developers and proprietary publishers for the release of copyrighted third party content in the development of OER will also be provided as a benchmark for relevant changes in educational publishing. Furthermore, a lens into the widening stakeholder vision for uses of open English language resources across a range of teaching and learning contexts in higher education, including formal and informal, online and face-to-face learning, will also be charted.


Speakers
AF

Alannah Fitzgerald

SCORE Fellow, Doctoral Student, OER International programme with the Higher Education Academy in the UK, Concordia University
I am an open education practitioner and researcher working in the area of technology-enhanced learning for English Language Teaching (ELT). I’m also a doctoral candidate in Educational Technology at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada. Having worked in higher education (HE) for a little over a decade now, I’ve also been working in the areas of in-service teacher training for Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL... Read More →


Tuesday October 16, 2012 11:50am - 12:35pm
C400

12:35pm

Lunch
Tuesday October 16, 2012 12:35pm - 2:05pm
Lobby

2:00pm

OpenStax Tutor: Open Personalized Learning

Significant efforts are underway to transition learning from today’s “one-size-fits-all” approach to one that personalizes the learning experience according to the needs and skills of particular students. Several systems have achieved some success by writing out a massive set of rules dictating how to teach a student a topic given that student’s prior learning performance. These rule-based systems are painstakingly constructed by a team of domain experts, computer scientists, and cognitive scientists for one specific course. This approach has two major disadvantages. The resources required to build the system for one course makes scaling up to many courses prohibitively expensive. And even assuming scalability, rule-based approaches are fragile: what happens when a student deviates from the course’s predetermined rules and how can these global rules be truly personalized for different kinds of learners?

OpenStax Tutor, a collaboration between engineers and cognitive scientists at Rice University and Duke University, addresses these challenges by fusing cognitive science learning strategies and modern machine learning algorithms; the result is an automated, personalized, and optimized learning experience for today’s courses and students.

OpenStax Tutor can marshal many different open educational resource (OER) sources in its quest to improve student learning, but two repositories stand out: Connexions (cnx.org) for rich e-texts and Quadbase (quadbase.org) for assessments. Connexions is one of the world’s first and largest OER projects. Connexions’ repository of free, open-source educational content is accessible to students, instructors, and authors worldwide. Quadbase is an open access question bank, focused on serving instructors and educational platforms with support for multiple question types and embedding options. Both platforms thrive on community-submitted and -curated content, and access remains free to all under a Creative Commons attribution license.

OpenStax Tutor runs on a unique pairing of two suites of advanced machine learning algorithms. The first takes a large corpus of OER materials, including texts, questions, videos, and simulations, automatically determines how these materials interrelate, and stores them in Linkify (linkify.org), a new system for understanding semantic links between web resources. The second takes the relationships from Linkify along with student learning records, and chooses each student’s next learning step to optimize their progress. These decisions are based on each student’s individual learning record, in addition to knowledge of other student’s prior successes and failures. OpenStax Tutor also builds on proven learning strategies from cognitive science. Questions for a topic are asked when the topic is introduced and at several later times to lock the knowledge in. Students also receive immediate feedback when working through assessments. Outcomes from the machine learning algorithms also provide fine-grained learning diagnostics on instructor and student dashboards.

Building off our initial success at Rice University, OpenStax Tutor is currently in its second round of pilot testing at several universities.

In this 45 minute session, OpenStax Tutor architect, JP Slavinsky, and algorithms expert, Richard Baraniuk, will overview the primary components of the system. Project Manager, Daniel Williamson, will overview the community approach to developing content in both Connexions and Quadbase.


Speakers
avatar for Daniel Williamson

Daniel Williamson

Managing Director, Connexions, Rice University


Tuesday October 16, 2012 2:00pm - 2:45pm
C485

2:00pm

The Open Assignment Bank of ds106 and Remixing Thereof

ds106 is an open course in Digital Storytelling based at the University of Mary Washington. Central to the course is a collection of assignments created by participants (well over 300), each ranked by degree of difficulty. This year we added a remix generator, combining random assignments with a remix "card" detailing how to do it differently. Students are asked to use as starting material the work of other students from the original assignment. Experience these first hand at this session.


Speakers
avatar for Jim Groom

Jim Groom

Co-Founder, Reclaim Hosting
I like long walks on the internet, Italian b-grade horror films, and ds106 (#4life). I worked at University of Mary Washington for almost a decade doing instructional technology, and my partner Tim Owens and I have been running the web hosting company Reclaim Hosting for more than 2 years now, and it is insanely fun and cool to be creating something as we go. My professional interests are open education, digital identity and distributed... Read More →


Tuesday October 16, 2012 2:00pm - 2:45pm
C485

2:00pm

Before we leave content behind

At first glance, the meaning of the term "content" could not be more obvious. It is the stuff we share, study, watch, create and mashup on the Web. However, a closer look at content as substance, as educational, as opposed to form, and even --deposed or enthroned on the Web-- as king, raises many more questions. What is the ³educational² nature of content and how does it relate to its (re)usability?  How does form (e.g. learning designs, management systems) relate to content? And what makes it valuable or valueless? This presentation
will both raise and explore these questions, in the form of a dialogue between the two presenters -one that will gradually expand to include the audience as well. This dialogue will tap in to ideas of curriculum as an overall structure that both enables and limits the coherence of educational ³contents,² contexts and purposes. It will also look at the issue of specificity and irreplaceability that is implied in the notion of content as substance and
materiality -as something that is actually specific to a place and time, rather than ubiquitous  and (theoretically) endlessly adaptable. Our point, in short, will be to show that content is something to understand more fully before we leave it behind.
 


Speakers
avatar for Irwin DeVries

Irwin DeVries

Interim Associate Vice-President, Open Learning, Thompson Rivers University, Open Learning
TRU


Tuesday October 16, 2012 2:00pm - 2:45pm
C400

2:00pm

Creating a User Driven Approach to the Development of OER

Innovate, Collaborate, Engage: Creating a User Driven Approach to the Development of Open Educational Resources

The University of British Columbia supports an institutional wiki that serves as collaborative authoring space. The UBC Wiki is used as an open knowledge repository, a collection of university training materials and documentation, and a rapidly growing set of course materials and open educational resources. One such resource is the Math Exam Resources (MER) wiki, a community project started in March 2012 by graduate students at the UBC Math Department to provide an open and free educational resources to undergraduate students. The MER wiki was developed using an innovative approach that allowed for mass collaboration, rapid development, student engagement, and robust reuse. What makes a healthy environment that supports user inovation in the  development of such open educational content? Meet Will and David; a wiki administrator and an educator, who will share their perspectives on their collaboration and its results. Through this dialogue, they will
explore how resource architecture and adaptable systems are important  for the creation of effective open education material. They will close the session with some best practices, daydreaming, and their vision for what's possible next.


Speakers
avatar for David Kohler

David Kohler

PhD candidate, The University of British Columbia


Tuesday October 16, 2012 2:00pm - 2:45pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

2:00pm

OER to the Max

OER to the Max: How one Community College is transforming its entire department through the use of open resources

The math department at SCC is making a concerted effort to adapt, create, and adopt open source materials for our students. To that end, groups of faculty have focused on replacing traditional textbooks and supplementary materials for specific courses with open source materials. Beginning in the Fall 2012 semester, and each semester thereafter, students in our standard, face-to-face Introductory Algebra, Intermediate Algebra, and College Algebra classes will be able to obtain text-based and computer-based materials at no charge (or a very small charge for a bound, hard copy of the materials). These students will no longer need to purchase textbooks or ancillary online materials. Spring 2012 will see other courses coming on-board with OER materials including our Beginning Arithmetic 082 course and our Math142 College Math course.

The faculty teams have actively reviewed available materials and have made connections to our district curriculum and they have maintained our departmental philosophy of teaching mathematics for understanding. In many cases faculty have included their own contributions to the world of open educational resources and in turn freely shared those resources through sites such as youtube, livescribe, our department-developed website http://score.scottsdalecc.edu, or our department-driven, open-source, online homework system: http://mathas.scottsdalecc.edu.

In this session, our faculty team will:

    Share samples of OER books and workbook materials

    Share samples of created resources including Livescribe videos, Softchalk lessons, Screencasts
    Share samples of a new OER book created for the ipad using the ibooks Author software
    Demonstrate WAMAP (open source math homework deliver system)
    Discuss co-development and sharing of libraries and course templates in WAMAP with other Maricopa District schools (Phoenix College, Paradise Valley)
    Demonstrate Score website (our in-house repository for activities)
    Discuss tips and tricks to get and keep faculty interested and evolved in such projects
    Discuss the class delivery systems in which the OER materials are utilized including hybrid and online classes and modified “flipped” in-person classes
    Discuss how our department has been transformed by our OER projects



The impact of these projects is real for our students. On average, the courses listed above enroll 1800+ students each semester. If we consider the cost of savings to our students (at a very roughly estimated average cost of somewhere between $75-$125 per student) we should see an overall savings of somewhere between $135,000-$225,000 for fall 2012 alone, or $270,000-$450,000 per year for our students. This is not the only impact, however. All materials we develop will be our own to use, reuse, revise and redistribute. We will never have another forced textbook upgrade from the publishers. We will not have to worry about digital licenses, registrations, and bundles. We will be able to edit materials instantly. We will share these materials as prototypical courses that we will willingly share with anyone, in the district or beyond. In short, we are taking OER to the max!


Speakers
avatar for Donna Gaudet

Donna Gaudet

Mathematics Faculty, Scottsdale Community College
Donna Gaudet is a mathematics teacher from Arizona that has converted almost her entire curriculum to open source resources. Donna is passionate about helping students and about teaching and learning.
avatar for Paul Golisch

Paul Golisch

Dean of Information Technology, Paradise Valley Community College
I want students in developmental math courses to be successful in achieving their academic goals without paying for textbooks or online homework programs. I also want them to have some fun and get to know other students as they move through the math course sequence.
avatar for James Sousa

James Sousa

Math Faculty, Phoenix College
As a math instructor, I enjoy helping students reach their goals and improve their lives. I believe a part of this is providing students quality instructional resources free or at a very low cost. | | | | Personally, I enjoy early morning exercise, staying active, and making the most of each day.


Tuesday October 16, 2012 2:00pm - 2:45pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

2:45pm

Break
Tuesday October 16, 2012 2:45pm - 3:00pm
Lobby

3:00pm

Closing Plenary – Creative Commons

The closing plenary by Creative Commons will include:

  • launch of CC Version 4.0
  • Open Policy Institute
  • School of Open
  • LRMI

Speakers
avatar for Jane Park

Jane Park

Director of Platforms and Partnerships, Creative Commons
Jane leads CC's work with platforms, helping to create easy, clear, and enjoyable ways for users to contribute to the commons. She has eight years of organizational experience in open education, communications, fundraising, and community building. As a founding volunteer of the Peer 2 Peer University, she has designed and taught a variety of online courses from creative writing to Creative Commons for educators. She has a BA in Philosophy and... Read More →
avatar for Timothy Vollmer

Timothy Vollmer

Policy Manager, Creative Commons
Right now I work on public policy issues at Creative Commons. I also ride bikes and bake bread.


Tuesday October 16, 2012 3:00pm - 3:45pm
C300

3:45pm

Pitchfest

The Pitchfest is an open “bazaar” for pitching and exchange of existing open education resources, services or opportunities. Pitches are encouraged to seek trade, adoption and use of existing open resources and the formation of partnerships for shared use and improvement.

Current Entries include

  • CourseSites - Blackboard
  • Multi-access learning delivery and possibilities for openness – University of Northern British Columbia
  • Reusable Reuse Cards – The Open University
  • School of Open – P2PU
  • KarmaNotes – FinalsClub.org/KarmaNotes.org

Tuesday October 16, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
C300
 
Wednesday, October 17
 

9:00am

Welcome
Speakers
avatar for Paul Stacey

Paul Stacey

Associate Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons
I live just outside Vancouver Canada and work on Creative Common's global open education and open business models initiatives. I like ping pong, cycling, art, food, and drink - count me in on parties.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Wednesday October 17, 2012 9:00am - 9:15am
C300

9:15am

Keynote - Open for What? Open to What? Beyond Content.

 Open for What? Open to What? Beyond Content.

Given this welcome step beyond content (it was way too hard to organize), I consider two other elements of open education: The first is what we might be open for educationally. This is a call to rethink educational purpose beyond credentialing and in favor of service, given the massively open demonstrations of educational interest afoot today. The second element is what we might necessarily be open to educationally, given the sheer size of the web, and thus the corresponding need to learn and develop new evaluation strategies, and put them to use as an example of for what, or to what ends, we might educate. 


Speakers

Wednesday October 17, 2012 9:15am - 10:15am
C300

10:15am

Break
Wednesday October 17, 2012 10:15am - 10:30am
Lobby

10:30am

Mozilla Open Badges: into the great wide open

Mozilla Open Badges: into the great wide open

Open Badges is a simple digital badge standardization system with an extremely powerful tool at the center of it: the Open Badge Infrastructure. Thanks to the sort of swiss army knife-ness of this tool, the system is highly flexible and highly resilient. And now that we've launched beta we're beginning to see the makings of some MacGyver-esque uses of this tool.

This session will provide a through-the-looking-glass view into the development of Mozilla's Open Badges. The OBI, even in it still nascent state, has not been without its learning moments. During this 45 minute session we'll share our development processes, our information dissemination methods, our community building practices, as well as our hard-earned lessons about the best ways to engage all interested parties in creating, producing and using an open source tool.

Our learning moment observations will range from watching small Issuers become confused by our documentation to trying to land powerful Displayers to help flesh out the ecosystem. We'll discuss the ways in which our beta initiative has been buffeted by personal opinion, anecdotal evidence and a smidgen of design research. You'll see the team go from realizing that our tool needs a front end to figuring out how much front end it needs.

A new standard, even one as obvious as the Open Badge micro-standard takes a few hits getting to market—and we're still getting there. During our journey, some of our primary tenets have been called into question and we have reconsidered significant aspects of our methodology; we've been hit up with unanticipated legal questions and run into unexpected delays. We'll consider how and why this might have happened and what we did about it. You'll get a peek into the role of evangelism plus our take on an earner's right to privacy. You'll sweat with us as we delve into the tangled world of product iteration. We'll explain our process for coming to terms with ideas antithetical to a non-profit ethos, i.e., allowing your allegedly agnostic tool to be used agnostically. Along those lines, we'll examine the role of branding, focus, commitment and the 800lb gorilla of the sociocultural status quo.

Creating a new standard—even one that offers interoperability, is open source, and soon to be federated—is a serious undertaking. Join us on this raucous trip as we release Open Badges to the wild.


Speakers
avatar for Carla Casilli

Carla Casilli

Director of Badge System Design, Mozilla Foundation
Carla is Mozilla's Badge System Design Lead. At Mozilla, she explores, examines and documents badge systems—both internal and external to Mozilla. She focuses her many years of strategic consulting, design thinking, and simplified communications experience on the improvement and encouragement of alternative credentialing systems in between thinking through the future of educational assessment efforts. She spearheads Mozilla's Web Literacy... Read More →


Wednesday October 17, 2012 10:30am - 11:15am
C485

10:30am

Siyavula: OER production and Open Badges Infrastructure

Siyavula: OER production and Open Badges Infrastructure as a platform for professional development in South Africa.

Community building and collaborative authoring are key features of the Siyavula business plan and sustainability model. These processes provide a superb opportunity to address the need for training within the teaching sector in South Africa.

Through collaborative authoring Siyavula is driving a successful professional development programme for educators in South Africa that simultaneously strengthens communities of practice, improves IT-literacy and expands content knowledge.

These skills are recognised using a badge system built on the Open Badge Infrastructure. I will cover the full scope of the community strategy, the assessment protocol for awarding of badges and the impact in the broader education sector.


Speakers

Wednesday October 17, 2012 10:30am - 11:15am
C485

10:30am

Glitz, Glamor and Going Open: Lessons from the Open Course Librarians

Participants in this session will interact with courses designed through the Open Course Library (OCL) project. Our emphasis will be demonstrating how librarians influence the creation of the OCL courses. Our panel of OCL librarians will share our expertise on supporting instructors in all discipline areas with diverse needs in finding, using and releasing open education resources. Topics will include: integrating librarians into OER writing/adoption processes, the role of information literacy in open education, engaging a diverse team in the OER creation process and advocating for open education among librarians. Attendees should expect a lively conversation with the panel of expert librarians.


Speakers
avatar for Shireen Deboo

Shireen Deboo

I'm a community college librarian with a background in housing, human services, community organizing and community development. I'm interested in bringing libraries to the center of the open education movement.
TS

Tria Skirko

Librarian, Wenatchee Valley College
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OER Project Director, Tacoma Community College
Librarian, Administrator | I am the OER Project Director at Tacoma Community College and I believe that adopting, adapting and accessing OER empowers faculty, students and administrations to grow educational opportunities. I've been a user, a pusher, a creator and a teacher of OER. (From the College Open Textbooks Community)


Wednesday October 17, 2012 10:30am - 11:15am
C680 - HSBC Hall

10:30am

Internet Library: with structured data it's much more than reading

Wolne Lektury is a free online library created with functionalities for readers and rich experience in mind. All the texts are adequately edited - annotated with footnotes and motifs - and are available in several formats - HTML , TXT , PDF, EPUB, MOBI, thanks to fully automated export from source XML. It must be noted, that automatically generated PDF for printing are of excellent quality and easily customizable by the user.

The Wolne Lektury library is available also through digital applications for Android and iOS systems.

Good news is, that all software was made available under AGPL license, so everyone may take advantage of this technology and easily run similar library. Software is easily adaptable to different needs, and may be used in all aplications which require easy export to different e-book formats.

Currently Wolne Lektury archives 1722 books (in polish), including readings recommended by the Ministry of National Education which have already fallen in the public domain. The library also contains a few hundred audiobooks read by famous actors like: Danuta Stenka, Jan Peszek or Andrzej Chyra. The audiobooks can be used in MP3 and Ogg Vorbis formats. They are also available in DAISY format suiting the needs of people with poor vision, the blind, and those having reading difficulties.

You are allowed to browse, listen to, and download all the items in Wolne Lektury, as well as share and cite them, entirely free of charge.

Wolne Lektury is a pro bono project developed by the Modern Poland Foundation in cooperation with Polish libraries – the National Library, the Library of Silesia and the Library of Elbląg, under the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage and the Assocciation of Polish Writers auspices.

The majority of books in the library are free of copyright and are in the public domain, which means that they can be freely published and redistributed. If a piece of work is given additional materials (footnotes, literary motifs, etc.), which are copyrighted, these materials are made publicly available under the licence Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike. We also publish several texts dedicated to the public domain by their authors or copyright owners under the licence Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike.



Wednesday October 17, 2012 10:30am - 11:15am
C680 - HSBC Hall

10:30am

Creative Commons Mongolia Affiliate Roadmap

Since the transition from a planned economy to a market-based democracy in the early 1990s, Mongolian higher education has experienced a marked expansion. Between 1992 and 2007, the number of tertiary education institutions has increased more than four-fold and enrollment more than six-fold, with the gross enrollment ratio growing from 14 to 47 percent of high school graduates. However, many Mongolians believe the quality of education still remains poor, although the costs of higher education are increasing gradually. Introducing and adapting Open Educational Resources (OER) for the Mongolian higher education sector could help reverse these trends. 

There is a growing interest across Mongolia for the use of Creative Commons’ (CC) licensed educational resources by faculty, institutions and government as because CC licensed materials could provide the legal and technical infrastructure essential to the long-term success of OER. Confidence in moving in this direction and the development of public policy is dependent on the availability of localized versions of the Creative Commons licenses in Mongolian. Currently, Mongolia is not among more than 70 CC jurisdictions worldwide with an affiliate, although the licences have been in use since 2011.

The International Development Research Center (IDRC), Canada through the DREAM IT project supported the initial roadmap development for a CC Mongolia affiliate. A Creative Commons Mongolia affiliate is expected to boost human capital development and lifelong learning initiatives across Mongolia by working with education providers in both the formal and informal sectors to promote knowledge and skill acquisition through the use and open licensing of learning resources.

The specific objectives of Creative Commons Mongolia affiliate are:

●Support government, institutions, and organizations in the open licensing of data sets, copyright works, research reports, statistics, photographic images, educational resources, and other digital resources
●Support collaborations and partnerships to maximize government investments in education, including the sustainable development and distribution of educational materials and the sharing of digital resources by the public, parents and students across Mongolia
●Complement laws pertaining to copyright and fair use by enabling creators to assert rights and communicate permissions for use, reuse and distribution
●Enable innovative new business models in the public and private sectors using open data
●Support the revision of policy regulating the production and use of open educational resources for general education and other public services
●Contribute to raising awareness and adoption of open licensing frameworks for authors, educators, creators, businesses
●Promote creative and innovative activities which deliver social and economic benefits for Mongolia and Mongolians

The Creative Commons Mongolia affiliate has an initial starting base in the higher education sector. Currently, the four largest Mongolian universities, the Mongolian University of Science and Technology, the National University of Mongolia, the Health Sciences University and the Mongolian State University of Education, are participating in this initiative to take the lead and will invite participation from other public and private universities. A memorandum of understanding (MoU) between Creative Commons and representatives of Mongolian universities is expected to be signed in September 2012. 



Wednesday October 17, 2012 10:30am - 11:15am
C400

10:30am

Strategies to foster OER and OER initiatives in developing regions

The creation of OpenCourseWare (OCW) by the MIT in 2001 can be considered as a milestone in the recent history of open educational resources (OER). Since then universities from around the world have adopted a set of associated open educational initiatives. After highlighting best practices in English speaking universities, this paper explores the current state of the OER movement in Latin American higher education (HE) institutions. Relevant open access initiatives are analyzed within this study in order to identify the strengths and opportunities of OER in Latin America.
An OER action research project, OportUnidad, founded by the European Commission is presented. This study, lead by a partnership of European and Latin American universities, aims to increase the awareness and institutional support of OER in Latin American HE. Based in this action-research project, this article analyses the impact of digital technologies in education, particularly regarding the generation, adoption and dissemination of educational content. The analysis also enquires whether recent open educational practices (OEP) promoted by universities such as Stanford, MIT or Harvard can leverage dynamics of innovation in HE. In addition, an overview is provided of the trends that are currently influencing the transformation in education in the Internet Era. The paper concludes by highlighting some of the challenges and conditions required to foster the adoption of OER in the Latin American region.


Speakers
avatar for Cristobal Cobo

Cristobal Cobo

Cristobal Cobo works on a number of European research projects, focused on creating open knowledge sharing and dissemination networks to promote the exchange of good practices and strategies for building a better global education in the 21st Century.
DV

Daniel Villar-Onrubia

Daniel is interested in the social and cultural implications of ICTs in Higher Education contexts. His work attempts to provide an in-depth understanding of the socio-technical factors that both enable and constrain the provision of open educational resources (OER) at several Spanish universities. In this regard, it focuses on the role of open educational practices in relation to the strategic orientation of universities as well as to the values... Read More →


Wednesday October 17, 2012 10:30am - 11:15am
C400

11:20am

Assessment of the usefulness and impact of OCW Scholar courses

In 2011, MIT OpenCourseWare began publishing a series of 20 unique courses designed for independent learners. This paper explores the usefulness and impact of these resources. With the support of the Stanton Foundation, MIT OpenCourseWare set out to create resources that were not simply documents taken from classrooms and published online, but instead resources in which classroom content had been transformed into content designed for online learning, being both substantially complete and organized in logical sequences. While representing a new approach to course publication for MIT OpenCourseWare, the materials nonetheless held to the OCW model of being content only, without peer or faculty interaction and without certification. Through a series of surveys and interviews, and through analysis of web analytics, MIT OpenCourseWare has conducted a study of the usefulness and impact of these resources.


Speakers
avatar for Steve Carson

Steve Carson

MIT OpenCourseWare, the OCW Consortium.


Wednesday October 17, 2012 11:20am - 12:05pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

11:20am

Visualizing Learning Data

The Open Learning Initiative (OLI) has been collecting learning data for a decade. The learning activities in our online courses record data on how students use the activities as well as their performance on them. Each question is mapped to a student-centered measurable learning objective in addition to individual skills to create an overall view, which can be used to answer any range of questions about student knowledge state to content mistakes. As we have learned to utilize this data, we have created tools for instructors to see at a glance how their classrooms are performing based on learning outcomes. However, we have not produced integrated ways of visualizing this data for course authors and learning scientists to use as they assess and improve courses.  Currently, the large amounts of data that courses generate can be cumbersome and difficult to interpret. These difficulties mean that learning data is not used as often as it could be and that course authors may need a long orientation period to understand how to effectively use the data.
Improving accessibility of data and speed with which it can be interpreted is essential. Data analysis plays a critical role in iterative course improvement, but it cannot reach its full potential and range of use at OLI or in the OER community without visualization tools that are easy to understand and available at the right time and context.
Over the last six months, we have been working on new visualization tools to support content authors so that they can use our data effectively and efficiently to target areas of their courses for improvement without having to run their own statistical analysis. During this presentation, OLI will discuss the discovery process we used to understand the workflow and needs of content authors. We will describe not only the vision OLI has for moving forward with data visualization, but also the process by which we arrived at our designs. Issues of granularity and context in particular will be addressed, along with ways for users to move seamlessly between appropriate visualizations.
We anticipate that these visualizations, and in particular how they are integrated into development tools, will help revolutionize the way iterative improvement is done at OLI in the future and look forward to sharing this process and findings with the OER community.


Speakers
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University


Wednesday October 17, 2012 11:20am - 12:05pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

11:20am

Fair Dealing for Educators

The purpose of the session will be to explain that while on some levels this could mark an improvement for educators using other than OER materials the reality is that we can't rely on the law to "open education." I'd really like to know who is coming to the conference and co-=present with folks who have some thoughts on this.

I also discussed with Andrew Rens moderating a discussion about recent caselaw the Boundless Learning case in the US and the one in South Africa.


Speakers
avatar for Martha Rans

Martha Rans

Founder, Lawshare/Artists Legal Outreach
I have been practicing law with co-ops, non profits, charities and socially minded folk for 20 years. I had a prior career as an employment lawyer and human rights mediator. Among my clients are the Cooperative Auto Network, Shift Delivery, Raised Eyebrow Web Studio. I teach legal literacy workshops across the Province. I will be at the Calgary Public Library talking about copyright at noon on Wednesday and welcome any questions from attendees... Read More →


Wednesday October 17, 2012 11:20am - 12:05pm
C485

11:20am

The OER FLOW and Social Media

This presentation introduces some strategies for producing, sharing and reusing OER through the OER Flow and social media. The aim of this investigation is to identify how colearners can apply the OER Flow and social media to make the production and adaptation processes of OER more explicit for anyone in the community to contribute. This work analyses, therefore, the interactions of “COLEARN” – an open community of research in collaborative learning technologies – who created and remixed diverse open media components for producing an open book about OER using the OER flow and Social Media. The outcomes shows that educators and colearners can move from a passive position to a more active and informed network role when they are able to co-authoring OER.


Speakers
SL

Scott Leslie

Creating an alternate reality since 1969
AO

Alexandra Okada

My current research focusses on Content Development for Reuse in ICOPER project with Dr. Peter Scott. BSc in Computer Science, MBA in Marketing and Knowledge Management, a MA and PhD in Education


Wednesday October 17, 2012 11:20am - 12:05pm
C485

11:20am

What lies beneath? Diving into the pre-history of OER

Drawing on an exhaustive examination of the history of sharing academic materials digitally, primarily in the UK but also worldwide, we will be examining the policy and business assumptions behind a number of interventions. The "Open Education" movement has tended to define itself as a new movement, but we aim to demonstrate that it builds on a number of areas of earlier work, and that trends within Open Education are clearly identifiable as the remnants of the assumptions built in to previous ideas around sharing.

"OER" is characterised by the emphasis on open licences (Creative Commons) and web2.0 technologies. Whereas previous phases had a focus on learning management systems and repositories, OER approaches use a wider range of platforms. In addition, the increased emphasis on understanding use and usage of educational content has shone a spotlight on our assumptions. As the OER community begins to address those issues, tensions between various embedded traditions of sharing are felt.

Building on the work of Masterman and Wild (2011) and the informally published ideas of Leslie (2008 onwards) amongst others, we will argue that “sharing” is already a fundamental part of academic practice, and that various initiatives have exposed various aspects of this to greater scrutiny. Conversely, there are other parts of sharing practice that are “invisible”, either because it occurs privately or because it involves the breach of copyright and intellectual property laws.

In conclusion we argue for a historically nuanced approach to open education, and suggest a plurality of approaches to sharing.

References
Masterman and Wild (2011), “OER impact study, research report”
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearning/oer2/oerimpact.aspx

Leslie (2008), “Planning to Share versus Just Sharing”
http://www.edtechpost.ca/wordpress/2008/11/08/just-share-already/



Wednesday October 17, 2012 11:20am - 12:05pm
C400

12:05pm

Lunch
Wednesday October 17, 2012 12:05pm - 1:30pm
Lobby

1:30pm

Adventures in Development: Building and Implementing an Oral Communication Assessment Webapp

This presentation will offer lessons learned in an ongoing a collaboration between Baruch College, CUNY and Cast Iron Coding, a small Portland Oregon web development firm, in the development of VOCAT, an open-source oral communication assessment application that has now been widely integrated into the curriculum at Baruch. We will demonstrate the tool and detail the process of its development and chart the evolution of the collaboration between educators and web developers in developing and deploying an OER despite bureaucratic red tape, institutional resistance and a good dose of FUD. We will focus on the collaborative process of development and will approach the evolution of the project as parallel to the evolution of the relationship between web developers and academic administrators and faculty.

The Video Oral Communication Assessment Tool (VOCAT) is a web-based teaching tool and assessment instrument developed by the Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute at Baruch College. Built on an the open source CMS, TYPO3, VOCAT is a flexible, extensible, and potentially infinitely scalable web application designed to facilitate meaningful performance assessment and the collection and analysis of evaluation data in a wide range of instructional contexts.

Since 2007, we at Baruch College have used VOCAT with great success to teach and assess public speaking in several courses across our entire curriculum, from Speech and Theater to Accounting and Business Policy. It also has been used to collect data for our business school's program assessment. To date, approximately 9,600 of our students have used VOCAT in 26 distinct classes (673 sections total.) We are now moving toward sharing VOCAT with others thanks to two fairly recent developments:

1) The Middle States Commission on Higher Education?s site visit team to Baruch College recognized the promise in VOCAT for face-to-face and online instruction and noted that VOCAT ?should be celebrated as a national model for higher education.? 2) In the fall of 2010, The Chronicle of Higher Education ran an article on VOCAT that focused on future possible uses of the tool in all manner of instruction (is.gd/dPMvTR)

With more and more institutions reaching out to us to inquire about VOCAT, we are starting to make sense of what it means to share the tool and to work toward building an active, vibrant community of developers and users.



Wednesday October 17, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

1:30pm

Subtitles, Transcripts and You(Tube)

With the proliferation of OE video resources comes the increasing demand for transcription and captioning. What are the benefits of captions and transcripts in terms of accessibility? How does providing captions and transcripts increase search ability on YouTube and Google? How can OER providers afford the substantial costs of providing these services in spite of limited resources? This is an opportunity to learn what we at MIT OpenCourseWare have done to address these issues, and for you to share your methods as well.


Speakers
avatar for Brett Paci

Brett Paci

Video Publication Manager, MIT OpenCourseWare


Wednesday October 17, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

1:30pm

Engaging Students as Open Education Advocates

College students are a powerful but often overlooked ally in the open education movement.  As the primary beneficiaries of OER, students are uniquely positioned to be effective advocates to instructors, colleges and policy makers.  However, students often understand openness differently than members of the community do, and may value it for different reasons.  In this session, the directors of two large student efforts for open education and open access will share exclusive insight into the student perspective on openness, examples of what students from across the globe are doing to have an impact, and to begin engaging students in open education efforts.


Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for Nick Shockey

Nick Shockey

Director of Programs & Engagement, SPARC
Nick Shockey is the Director of Programs & Engagement for SPARC and founding Director of the Right to Research Coalition, an international alliance of student organizations that promote Open Access to the results of research through advocacy and education. As the Director of Programs & Engagement, Nick is responsible for growing SPARC’s engagement with members and the wider community, managing SPARC’s digital platforms, and... Read More →


Wednesday October 17, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
C400

1:30pm

Open Textbooks And Solving The College Cost Crisis

The average U.S. college student spends more than $1,000 per year on textbooks, which can rival the cost of tuition at some institutions.  As textbook prices continue to soar more than quadruple the rate of inflation, the inefficient and anti-consumer practices of the traditional publishing industry only make matters worse.

Open textbooks and other OER have tremendous potential as a solution to this problem.  With today's rapidly changing student preferences, open textbooks could revolutionize the way textbooks are bought and sold - the full text is offered free online, low-cost hard copies can be sold in the bookstore, and a wide range of print and digital formats are available online.  Open textbooks also give instructors more tools to shape students' learning environment, acting as an important gateway to more extensive use of OER.


Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e


Wednesday October 17, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
C400

1:30pm

Bildung as a critical foundation for open education

Despite the recent increases of interest in Open Education (notably in the Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC; Fini, 2009) it has been continuously asserted that Open Education lacks a philosophical or theoretical foundation (Vandenberg, 1975). Similar accusations have been made with respect to distance education, which some have identified as being slow to engage with critical debates in theory and research (Evans & Nation, 1992). In a similar vein, Danaher, Wyer and Bartlett (1998) claim that researchers in open and distance learning tend to draw on too narrow a range of theoretical resources in their research. Given the considerable rise of Open Education over the last years, these critical appraisals urge us to expand theoretical approaches to refine our understanding of evolving pedagogical and technological relations (cf. Bell, 2011). In this paper, we contribute to debates surrounding open education and open educational resources by introducing the concept of Bildung (self-cultivation; self-realization) as a powerful reflective tool. We will elaborate on the potentials of Bildung by reviewing the history of the concept and exploring the extent to which Bildung can provide open education with a theoretical framework. Our focus here will not be exclusively on open educational resources (OER): it will be stressed that ‘openness’ in education necessarily shifts the focus from content (OER) to practices (OEP) that are necessary for the use of that content (Mackey & Jacobson, 2011, p. 62; cf. Weller, 2011).

We argue (1) that there are significant potentials to elicit or encourage Bildung through the use of OER, such as through providing open access to a rich base of materials from various cultural contexts. In this process of engaging with multiple and complex resources it can be assumed that a transformation of the way in which the individual is approaching learning is likely to happen. The reflections of these experiences are educational and a key factor for the theoretical underpinning of OER. We go on to suggest (2) that the beliefs and values associated with Bildung – including autonomy, critical reflection, inclusivity and the rejection of universal narratives – are suitable for providing a theoretical framework for OER as well as providing a critical lens through which to assess contemporary educational models in practice (e.g. Liessmann, 2006).


Speakers
avatar for Rob Farrow

Rob Farrow

Research Fellow, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror | | Project URLS: | http://oerhub.net/ | https://oerworldmap.org/ | http://go-gn.net/ | http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/


Wednesday October 17, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
C485

2:15pm

Break
Wednesday October 17, 2012 2:15pm - 2:20pm
Lobby

2:20pm

A Student Measure of the Quality of Open Digital Textbooks

The cost of textbooks is a financial burden on many college students. Fortunately, the advent of open educational resources (OER) has allowed for the development of textbooks and other content at significantly reduced costs. Many college faculty are using OER to develop customized textbooks for their students, usually published online in a digital format. Pilot data show that many of these faculty desire quality feedback from their students to help them develop and improve their texts. However, there is no measurement model describing digital textbook quality from the student perspective. Such a model would allow for the development of a high fidelity rating instrument that could provide valid and reliable student feedback for faculty to use in improving their open digital textbooks. In this presentation I will describe and discuss results of a qualitative study conducted to develop this measurement model.

My study focused on two main research questions:

1. What are the most desirable characteristics of a high quality digital textbook from the perspective of college students?

2. How do these desirable characteristics translate into a measurement model of students’ perception of digital textbook quality?

To answer the first question, I used questionnaires, interviews, and published journal articles to identify the desired characteristics of digital textbooks from the college student perspective. Over 500 community college students using open textbooks as part of an ongoing OER initiative called Project Kaleidoscope (http://www.project-kaleidoscope.org) responded to a questionnaire containing closed and open-ended items. These items asked students about their perceptions of various properties of the textbooks they were using in their courses. Students who complete the questionnaire were given an opportunity to choose to be interviewed by phone about their perceptions of the quality of digital textbooks. Each interview lasted from 15-30 minutes and attempted to engage the students in a discussion about what made digital textbooks useful and interesting to them. Interviewing allowed for a much deeper exploration of students’ perceptions of textbook quality than could be obtained by questionnaires alone. Specifically, conducting interviews with students allowed for focused, clarifying discussions on the most often mentioned characteristics of digital textbooks in the questionnaire responses. Ten students completed interviews and their data was combined with the questionnaire data. Finally, I surveyed the literature on textbook evaluation. This archival data was used to frame the data that came from the questionnaire and interviews. Specifically, I compared what the experts on textbook evaluation suggested in the published literature with the themes and concerns expressed by the students.

To answer the second question, I used thematic analysis to explore the data from the questionnaires, interviews, and literature. The finalized themes from this analysis became the target constructs in an initial measurement model of digital textbook quality from the college students’ perspective.

Future work will include a quantitative study to evaluate and improve the measurement model. This validated model will then be used to create a high fidelity rating instrument that faculty can administer to their students to obtain valid and reliable feedback about their open digital textbooks.


Speakers
avatar for TJ Bliss

TJ Bliss

Program Officer, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
Working to understand the costs, outcomes, use, and perceptions of OER. Passionate about my family, my religion, and my job.


Wednesday October 17, 2012 2:20pm - 3:05pm
C400

2:20pm

Using Open Textbooks in Community Colleges

Proponents of open educational resources believe that significant cost savings are possible when open textbooks displace traditional textbooks in the college classroom. Yet others claim that open textbooks are of inferior quality. The Open Education Group examined this issue by surveying over 1,000 students about their experience using open textbooks. These students were involved with the Kaleidoscope project. We also surveyed faculty members involved in the course. Students and faculty were asked about their perceptions of the cost and quality of open textbooks used in a community college context. Results showed that the majority of students and faculty had a positive experience using the open textbooks, appreciated the lower costs, and perceived the texts as being of high quality. The potential implications for OER initiatives at the college level seem large. If primary instructional materials can in fact be made available to students at no or very low cost, without harming learning outcomes, there appears to be a significant opportunity for disruption and innovation in higher education.


Speakers
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.


Wednesday October 17, 2012 2:20pm - 3:05pm
C400

2:20pm

Scaling Up a Bridge to Success! Diverse audiences and unexpected outcomes in cross-institutional OER practice

The Bridge to Success (B2S) project is enabling US college students and a wider audience to benefit from collaboratively refined Open Educational Resources (OER) developed from 'Openings' course materials from the Open University UK. The courses are designed to prepare learners for post-secondary education by developing learning techniques and foundational mathematics skills. With an emphasis on use of these skills in everyday lives, the courses aim to increase confidence and facilitate independent learning, enabling students to set life and study goals, participate in education and employment opportunities, develop their skills and reflect on their own learning. As part of the project US educators worked alongside the original authors of the courses to adapt the materials for the US context. Release of 'Learning to Learn' (L2L) took place in September 2011 and 'Succeed with Math' (SWiM) in January 2012.

Pilots of the courses by partner institutions targeted disadvantaged and underserved student groups in US community colleges. The first significant pilot took place in early 2012 and by May 2012 we were able to report use in 12 institutions and exceeded our target of 750 identified learners ahead of schedule. Use has also spread outside of the project's original remit; the courses are now being used in Family Support Centres, Workforce Development Agencies and High Schools. Plans include deployment in Libraries and Mayoral Employment Development Offices. This extension is a surprising and impressive result. The diverse appeal, flexibility and openness of B2S content are all factors in achieving rapid scaling. Both college and non-college institutions and agencies have committed to using B2S beyond the pilots and on a long-term basis. Qualitative and quantitative evidence for student success is emerging from a broad range of sources. Pre- and post- questionnaires show students gaining confidence in learning and mathematics skills and the students preferred way of learning also showed changes, indicating a stronger interest in “working with a group” and “having a structure”. Self-assessment points built into the units suggest strong improvements in students who initially struggled. For those working outside the college sector direct results could be seen: of 35 learners who originally failed a math entry test for a weatherization training program, 80% then passed after working with SWiM for a 1-3 week period. Partner colleges are adopting or integrating the courses into their curriculum whilst non-college piloting agencies are integrating B2S materials into their training programmes and courses.

Our research shows the combination of accessible content and openness is taking OER from use by those who are already independently IT and technologically literate to those learners trying to return to education lacking IT skills.

This presentation will showcase the project's research findings using diverse case studies to show how collaboration with a wide range of agencies took place, and explore the specific challenges facing students within these contexts. We also explore cross-institutional collaborations as solutions to ensure that OER is more widely available to those who would benefit from it most.


Speakers
avatar for Beck Pitt

Beck Pitt

Research Assistant, The Open University
Hi there! I'm a researcher on the Open Education Research Hub and Opening Educational Practices in Scotland (OEPS) project at the Open University (UK). Find out more: http://oerresearchhub.org | | Come and talk to me about all things open and how we (the Hub) could help you!


Wednesday October 17, 2012 2:20pm - 3:05pm
C485

2:20pm

Unleashing Innovation: unintended consequences of a CC-BY license

Collaborative Statistics is often highlighted in presentations and the media. How did this come to be and why is it still the case? Follow the improvement trail of an OER project as it continues to evolve with increased use. Learn about the services model around open learning materials. Learn how the CC-BY license has allowed for increased student learning and is launching innovative service models surrounding the “text.”

This presentation will include a brief history of how opening licensing Collaborative Statistics has allowed the content to take on a life of its own. The session will explore the text’s beginning as a for-profit book, the process by which the text became an open textbook, and the addition of OER multimedia support. The session will discuss how Collaborative Statistics became a prototype for Connexions, the dramatic adoption growth, and the support growing for OER materials. We will then discuss the unintended consequences of open licensing, including enhanced interactive versions, alignment with online assessment engines, adaptation for high schools, and international versions.

Finally, we will glimpse into the future by considering emerging open content that provide a contextualized learning experience available globally, administered locally, used asynchronously (via web or mobile phones), and available for the individual life-long learner.

Some of the organizations involved with the evolution of Collaborative Statistics include (alphabetical):
Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources
Connexions
Creative Commons
Foothill-De Anza Community College District
Maxfield Foundation
Openstax College
The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
StudentPIRGs
Twenty Million Minds Foundation
UC College Prep (UC Office of the President)


Speakers
avatar for Barbara Illowsky

Barbara Illowsky

Professor, Mathematics/Statistics, De Anza College


Wednesday October 17, 2012 2:20pm - 3:05pm
C485

2:20pm

5 years of TU Delft OpenCourseWare. What is next?

5 years ago TU Delft launched their OpenCourseWare website. This was a big step for the university, but has been very successful. In 5 year time we have published more than 90 courses; we started a national Special Interest Group for OER in the Netherlands; we got a grant from the European Commission to promote OpenCourseWare in European Higher Education and our Director of Education became the second president of the OpenCourseWare Consortium.

But what is the next step?

We started with more interaction by including the OpenStudy widget, and adding Facebook and Twitter integration.


Next to this we changed the focus to the use and re-use of our OpenCourseWare materials:

  • Choice of Study: provide introduction courses for all 15 Bachelor programmes.
  • Stumble Courses: Create extra rich courses for student to help them with the difficult courses.
  • Prepare International Students: Provide courses for international students to better prepare themselves for their time in Delft.
  • Use in Developing Countries: Use our course materials at universities in developing countries
  • Source of Reference: Provide a course as resource for students and Life Long Learns that they need to refer to often, such as our Delft Design Guide
  • Extracurricular education: Extracurricular courses for honors students, courses for mastering software programmes and courses of minors.
  • Online Education: Start with the online masters based on OCW-material.

For a traditional brick-and-mortar university offering online master programmes is a big step forward. We will start with three master programmes: Aerospace Engineering, Watermanagement and Engineering and Policy Analysis. The first online students will start in the academic year 2013-2014.


Speakers
avatar for Willem van Valkenburg

Willem van Valkenburg

Boardmember Open Education Consortium, Delft University of Technology
Responsible for the production and delivery of all the Open, Online and Blended Courses of TU Delft. This includes OpenCourseWare, MOOCs, ProfEd, Online MSc and blended courses. | I'm also Board member of the Open Education Consortium.


Wednesday October 17, 2012 2:20pm - 3:05pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

2:20pm

Are edX, Udacity and Cousera disruptive innovators?

Are edX, Udacity and Cousera disruptive innovators? If they are, is there a future for institutions like the Open University in the Netherlands?

Are MOOC’s disruptive innovators of open education. If so, what does this mean for open universities such as the Open University in The Netherlands?


Speakers
RS

Robert Schuwer

Professor, Open Universiteit/Fontys University of Applied Sciences


Wednesday October 17, 2012 2:20pm - 3:05pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

3:05pm

4:30pm

Dinner Cruise - Ship sails PROMPTLY at 4:30

http://vancouvercruises.com/


Wednesday October 17, 2012 4:30pm - 7:30pm
The Abitibi Dock B, Plaza Of Nations Marina, 750 Pacific Blvd, Vancouver
 
Thursday, October 18
 

9:00am

Welcome
Speakers
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Thursday October 18, 2012 9:00am - 9:15am
C300

9:15am

Keynote - You Cannot Build Open Policies Without People: the OER Brazil case and beyond

Almost 5 years into the OER Brazil project, one conclusion is clear: you cannot build open policies without people. We have worked at the bottom, with the grassroots. We have worked in the middle, with
cultural change and institutional mandates. We have worked at the top, developing policy and law. But without the voices of people nothing moves forward. You must identify your heros, your multipliers, and ask
them to amplify your voice. This is the recipe for consistent open policy progress


Speakers
avatar for Carolina Rossini

Carolina Rossini

Policy Manager, Facebook
Carolina Rossini is a Brazilian lawyer and policy advocate, working on the impact of the internet on development, human rights, intellectual property and telecommunications law and policy. She works at Facebook on the Global Connectivity Policy Team. Before joining Facebook, Carolina was the Vice President for International Policy and strategy at Public Knowledge, a non-profit that promotes freedom of expression, an open Internet, and access to... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2012 9:15am - 10:15am
C300

10:15am

Break
Thursday October 18, 2012 10:15am - 10:30am
Lobby

10:30am

Disaggregating universities: The future of higher education?

This paper is a reaction to the increasing high cost of higher education and the resulting inaccessibility for the millions of potential learners now seeking opportunities for quality higher education opportunities. The paper examines the cost centers associated with campus-based and online education systems and then suggests that disaggregation may prove to be a cost-effective way to reduce tuition payments, while maintaining quality. The paper suggests that discount services, now available to consumers in many industries may also be attractive in new models of higher education. The paper also briefly looks at the Open Educational Resources university initiative, a pilot, collaborative project attempting to test some of these innovations in a consortium of high quality, accredited public universities. Finally we note both the disruptive characteristics of this model and commiserate opportunities for innovative providers of higher education.


Speakers
avatar for Rory McGreal

Rory McGreal

Professor, Athabasca University
I am the UNESCO/Commonwealth of Learning/International Council for Open and Distance Education Chair in Open Educational Resources and the director of TEKRI at Athabasca University


Thursday October 18, 2012 10:30am - 11:15am
C400

10:30am

Moving to OER at AU - An Institutional Strategy

Supporting the widespread availability of OER is a goal that Athabasca University (AU) has embraced through association with the Commonwealth of Learning and by becoming a charter member of the OER University. The use of OER in AU programs has strategic local implications.

While much of the potential value of OER is expressed as easier, less costly access to content, AU learning designers also focus on their potential as resources for learning activities. One reason for this strategy is the desire to address a traditional weakness of distance education – low learner persistence.

In response to the challenges facing AU as it transforms the university and to the opportunities offered by open educational resources, an OER plan was developed. It captures AU’s strategic and operational approach – one that includes a series of workshops and community conversations designed for internal learning and capacity building across the university, and a series of showcase demonstrations of OER already developed and integrated into courses, with results from student and tutor feedback. These presentations share experiences and stimulate ideas about how using OER in course design may improve productivity by reducing costs, speeding up development, and offering students opportunities for engagement with learning resources in ways that should keep them interested in their studies and focused on their learning.

An inventory of existing OER is being developed for general access through an open repository. Design-based research projects are under way, and a survey of the perspectives of university faculty and staff on OER will soon be delivered. The results will not only provide a benchmark against which we will be able to measure awareness and adoption, but will also serve as an OER readiness tool.

The AU experience has shown that the shift from static proprietary content to dynamic learning environments populated by openly available learning resources needs to be approached as a systemic change with complex and often unanticipated ramifications. Like a brain developing new neural connections, the institution has to open new channels of communication among faculty, designers, developers and copyright officers. The focus shifts to evaluating the reliability of free resources and accepting a certain level of risk with respect to permanence. For externally produced OER that can be appropriated and repurposed, staff technical expertise needs to be fostered. In addition to basic quality of OER, features such as availability of base code, ease of repurposing, and appropriate Creative Commons licensing all must be considered.

Building on the research and practice of online educators and proponents of open educational resources around the world, Athabasca University is positioning itself for greater involvement in the development, adoption, and inclusion of OER into its courses. Recent pilot projects are consistent with the mission to remove barriers that restrict access and limit success in university-level study. Through a commitment to both increased equality and quality of educational opportunity for adult learners worldwide, AU is opening up many aspects of university practice, including course development.


Speakers
avatar for Cindy Ives

Cindy Ives

Acting Associate Vice President Academic (Learning Resources) and Director, Centre for Learning Design and Development, Athabasca University
avatar for Mary Pringle

Mary Pringle

Learning Designer, Centre for Learning Design and Development, Athabasca University
In a world filled with tools, needs, and potential, I try every day to discover what learners already know, what motivates them to learn, how they can best learn with the resources that the course design team can make available to them, and how to demonstrate to learners and administrators that they have learned something. I have been designing online courses and working with faculty development at Athabasca University since 2006. I have... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2012 10:30am - 11:15am
C400

10:30am

Analyzing and supporting interaction in complex scenarios: the case of DS106

DS106, a (fortunately-not-so-massive) open online course on digital storytelling offered by University of Mary Washington for both regular students and anybody with an internet connection, pivots on a blog (ds106.us) that aggregates all the activity of the course participants, but without being the centre of anything. Course main goal is to provide people with competences to fully tell their own real-life stories by using new available web 2.0 technologies.

Each participant in the course has to create a digital identity and a personal infrastructure (her own domain, blog, twitter, flickr, youtube and other web 2.0 services) and then start producing and sharing content, but also meta-content: new assignments, tutorials and how-tos, ranking or commenting on other participants’ creations, and so. The result is a huge collection of resources (and users), connected to each other, which may be difficult to grasp for newcomers (and teachers as well), especially when the number of users and resources increases after each course edition. Visualizing all the activity around DS106 is not a trivial issue.

Interaction in such a complex scenario implies receiving information from multiple channels and maintaining a personal collection of resources, as the course has a very flexible structure so students can focus on a particular subject according to their interests (i.e. visual assignments exposed through flickr) and/or enter and leave the course at any moment. Regarding people, maintaining a network of colleagues implies maintaining multiple identities through the ds106 site in itself, but also twitter, blogs, and so. The totality of DS106 is a very complex learning scenario which is the result of hundreds of personal infrastructures hooked up to the ds106 blog.

We would like to discuss how interactions in this networking infrastructure can be analyzed in order to support all the elements (students, resources, comments, assignments, etc.) so additional services can be devised and implemented without interfering with the natural flow of the course. These services could include assessment, network activity visualization, recommendation systems and reputation schemes (for both students and resources), among others. Basically, knowing who is who and what is what in the whole DS106 universe, as well as the relationships between whos and whats.

Nevertheless, adding new services to a learning scenario cannot be accomplished from a top-down approach only. Final users (in this case, DS106 students) need to be taken into account, as their needs may not coincide with course designers. Users may be reluctant to use a recommendation system if it is too intrusive or may negatively perceive a reputation scheme, so it is very important to design these additional services from a end-user (i.e. bottom-up) perspective.

In this session we would like to discuss with other participants in the DS106 course as well as with experts in social networks, open repositories, blogs and other web 2.0 services the possibilities of visualizing such a learning scenario and the technical details of a potential practical implementation. Following the basic premise “if it works, don’t touch it”, how can we extend DS106 to incorporate new services and user requirements?


Speakers
avatar for Jim Groom

Jim Groom

Co-Founder, Reclaim Hosting
I like long walks on the internet, Italian b-grade horror films, and ds106 (#4life). I worked at University of Mary Washington for almost a decade doing instructional technology, and my partner Tim Owens and I have been running the web hosting company Reclaim Hosting for more than 2 years now, and it is insanely fun and cool to be creating something as we go. My professional interests are open education, digital identity and distributed... Read More →
avatar for Julià Minguillón

Julià Minguillón

Teacher at the Computer Science, Multimedia and Telecommunication Department, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
think, discuss, create, code, analyze, visualize, share, repeat | | not always in the same order


Thursday October 18, 2012 10:30am - 11:15am
C485

10:30am

Designing Assessments and Granting Credit for Open Courseware and Prior Learning

This presentation discusses the challenges of, and possible solutions for, designing assessments that integrate PLA and Open Courseware, and grant credit for both. Thomas Edison State College students, all of whom are adults, usually come to the College with some prior learning that we can assess for college credit. One challenge, however, is that students don't usually bring knowledge or skills that fit neatly into a 3-credit course-sized box. Some have more than 3 credits' worth; others have only a piece of the puzzle that would address the learning outcomes they need to earn college credit. With Open Courseware, we can explore the possibility of supplementing students' prior learning with modules that help them fill in the gaps. The presenter will discuss ways in which Thomas Edison State College is developing assessments that measure at once both new and prior learning, acquired through both experiential and more traditional avenues. In addition, the presentation will address how this process has led us to think about learning and assessment in new ways: advising, learning outcomes, and competency-based education have all had to be reexamined in light of new developments.


Speakers
avatar for Marc Singer

Marc Singer

Vice Provost, Center for the Assessment of Learning, Thomas Edison State University
Talk to me about anything. I will try to keep up.


Thursday October 18, 2012 10:30am - 11:15am
C485

10:30am

Changing the Culture of Academia Towards Openness & Open Leadership

In this 45-minute session, we will spark audience discussions and encourage microblogging as we explore open visions of learning and leadership. Changes in demographics, enrollment patterns, decreased governmental funding, information accessibility, technological advancements, educational business models, systems infrastructure, and educational practices are but a few of the pressures that push and pull on open initiatives at post-secondary institutions.  Questions are being asked of our pedagogical approaches, student engagement in their learning, and institutional supports for teaching and learning.  Additionally, campus discussions regarding copyright practices, costs of textbooks and journal subscriptions, and e-learning/blended learning adoptions, have all combined to create a context for greater expectations of a new vision for learning.  At a time when many post-secondary institutions are facing significant pressures with the traditional models of support for learning, teaching, and leadership, changing the culture of academia toward openness provides the opportunity for enabling innovation in higher education.

What will that vision look like?  Open. The values and practices of open education and leadership will be at the heart of this vision.  Such vision entails moving away from the over-reliance on educational traditions. In this space between what was and what will be, we find a creative a set of tensions around the push and pull of openness in higher education.  The questions many of us are faced with include:

  •  How do traditional higher educational institutions and their administrative leaders embrace the disruption of open practices?
  •  In what ways can we explicitly engage open leadership to enable a new vision for higher education?
  •  How will faculty, staff, and administrators be asked to support changing to open models of organizational leadership?


By participating in a facilitated conversation about changing the culture of academia to embrace open educational practices and leadership on our campuses, we will explore the above questions and acquire new ideas / strategies for moving educational traditions and current leadership to embrace open practices. Participants are encouraged to bring questions, success stories, and lessons learned to share the diversity of approaches for enabling open practices on our campuses. Questions, strategies, lessons and resources will be collected and shared back with all participants.  Participants are also encouraged to bring electronic devices so that they can contribute to the discussions via shared documents, twitter, and other public channels of communication and sharing.  Artifacts acquired through our facilitated discussions, reflections and critical analyses will be collected and shared back to the group. Educators and/or administrators in all career stages, and prior knowledge of the open practices, are welcomed.

Li, C. (2010). Open Leadership: How Social Technology can Transform the Way you Lead. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.


Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Chu

Stephanie Chu

Director, Teaching & Learning Centre, Simon Fraser University
Passionate about advancing teaching and learning and related University community and culture. Imagine what we can do together! Future contact: Bittersweet departure from SFU and all the wonderful people there, and excited to meet and join new colleagues and collaborators as Vice Provost, Teaching & Learning at Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU) as of July 25, 2016.
avatar for Valerie Irvine

Valerie Irvine

Co-Director, TIE Research Lab, University of Victoria
UVic
WO

William Owen

University of Northern British Columbia
Open management and open practices are fundamental to my learning and sharing. In my new role as acting Dean of Student Success and Enrolment Management, I try to bring these philosophies and values to enable the teams I am part of to actualize their potentials.
avatar for Paul Stokes

Paul Stokes

Chief Information Officer, University of Victoria


Thursday October 18, 2012 10:30am - 11:15am
C680 - HSBC Hall

11:20am

Enabling Student Success in Open Education - the Australian Experience

As a consortium of 21 Australian educational providers Open Universities Australia (OUA) has, since 1993, enrolled more than 200,000 students and continues to provide access to over 1400 units and 170 qualifications. During the past five years OUA has experienced an annual enrolment growth in excess of 25% resulting in the organisation becoming the Australian leader in quality online tertiary education. By allowing potential candidates to make application to study without the provision of an entry score or previous study history, OUA endeavours to remove many of the barriers to university education such as distance, time and entry requirements.

One thing is clear; online education has enabled much greater participation and the trend will continue. Students who previously were unable or unlikely to take up tertiary education now have opportunities that were inconceivable not that long ago.

Last year over 55,000 students accessed online education through OUA from 89 different global locations. The top five international countries where OUA students were based in 2011 were the UK, USA, China, Singapore and Japan.

Since there are no entry requirements for any first-year undergraduate unit at OUA the resulting access scheme attracts a broad cohort of students with varying characteristics which can be identified as:

•Traditional students who access courses to continue educational pathways;
•Non-traditional students who may be part-time, mature-aged, of a language background other than English (LBOTE);
•High risk students with weak academic backgrounds and limited understanding of tertiary education expectations;
•Professionals wishing to upgrade skills in certain fields of vocational interest;
•Career changers who take up study to facilitate an entry point into a different profession;
•Mature-aged students who take up courses for personal interest; and
•International students of a language background other than English (LBOTE).

Fully online courses are constantly under the microscope and often scrutinized for their ‘equivalence’ to on-campus education. However, there is power in quality regardless of mode of delivery and any online organisation is only going to survive and thrive if they offer the best courses, from the best providers, supported by the best staff. That is one driver for OUA in establishing the Centre for Online Learning Excellence which focuses on high quality learning engagement to improve student retention, satisfaction and progression.

Equally critical is the support provided throughout the students’ lifecycle. A number of initiatives have been designed to improve access of an increasing diverse student population in higher education programs. This includes supporting students academically prior and during their study through a range of accredited and non-accredited Enabling Units, an online 24 hour Tutor support service for students and an early alert and intervention system for students at risk academically. OUA also provides professional development opportunities and webinars for tutors and course coordinators to facilitate collaboration and support.

The purpose of this session is to outline processes that Open Universities Australia has developed and evaluated to improve student participation and success in online learning. This presentation and discussion with participants will highlight the learning analytics, techniques and strategies for understanding how the design and facilitation of online education impacts student engagement and satisfaction. Outcomes will be shared from research undertaken and include understanding student characteristics in online and on campus learning environments, fostering inclusivity in large enrolment classes, improving student retention and progression along with evaluations of different technologies for online learning.


Speakers
DR

Darien Rossiter

Executive Director, Online Learning Excellence\nOpen Universities Australia\n \nDarien’s diverse career, has spanned higher education, government and industry working as a senior manager, media producer, educational designer, learning technologist, librarian


Thursday October 18, 2012 11:20am - 12:05pm
C400

11:20am

Evolution or Revolution? Perspectives on Open Education From Deans, Devotees, Doubters, and Doers

“Where we stand depends on where we sit.” “People don’t mind change; they mind being changed.” How and when people involve themselves in open educational activities often depends on where they sit and how empowered they feel. The session will begin by engaging the audience in an activity to identify doubts, barriers, concerns, and triumphs which faculty members, administrators, and students encounter in their evolution or revolution into the realm of open education. Panelists--an academic dean, a technical college faculty advocate and developer of open resources, a relative newcomer to OER on the faculty at a traditional community college, and a recent student participant in the Washington State Open Course Library--will then exchange personal experiences and suggest ways that others in similar positions might best create and promote open educational activities and materials. The audience will be encouraged to pose questions and add opinions during and after the panelists’ comments.


Speakers
SE

Steven Ellis

Dean of Instruction, Clover Park Technical College, Lakewood, WA
PV

Phil Venditti

Instructor, Clover Park Technical College
I love learning and teaching and trying to be a good person. Here are some of my passions: | | 1. Unpopular music. I have the privilege of hosting a classical music program every Friday afternoon on Northwest Public Radio (heard online at www.nwpr.org). | | 2. Educationally-valuable personal stories. A colleague of mine and I have collected many such stories into a searchable/addable site at www.goodstoriesforgoodlearning.org... Read More →
BZ

Brooke Zimmers

Faculty, Shoreline Community College


Thursday October 18, 2012 11:20am - 12:05pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

11:20am

How is your community sharing these days?

Open.Michigan enables University of Michigan (U-M) faculty, students, staff and others to share their educational resources and research with the world. As “open” is increasingly recognized by teachers and learners on our campus, we have had to respond to varying local applications in the spectrum of Open (open access content, open educational resources, the use of restrictive open licenses, etc) to teaching practices and dissemination of content. Faculty and students are motivated to share in different ways and often create community-centered spaces and public-facing content that is intended to be accessible and useful outside the University of Michigan community, but may not fit the strict definition of an open educational resource (OER).

Our initiative has responded to these applications of Open in a variety of ways. One example of our response is the development of a new collection policy. Open.Michigan seeks to reposition itself on campus in a way that supports the spectrum of openness, truly living up to the name “Open.Michigan.” This policy encompasses the curation of materials other than open educational resources, including open access podcasts on iTunes U, open teaching and learning experiences, relevant public domain works in repositories like HathiTrust, and others. It includes promoting and providing a record of (through the use of links) of any U-M teaching and learning resource or experience that is offered freely to the public.

As our initiative has evolved from developing and hosting an OER collection to supporting this community of open educational practitioners, Open.Michigan is interested in how these emergent practices are being enacted across institutions. We will give examples illustrating how Open.Michigan has shifted from publishing a University of Michigan OER collection to truly supporting the spectrum of open educational practices on campus, trying to effectively address the question, how is our community sharing these days and how can we support it?

We'd like to have a conversation with the open education community about experiences adding new types of content to our site and encouraging open innovation and participatory practices at the University of Michigan. How are these models shifting at other organizations? What are the sharing drivers in your community? How are teachers and learners interested in sharing and how can open education practitioners support the vast expansion of sharing options in today’s digital learning landscape?


Speakers
DM

David Malicke

Operations Specialist, University of Michigan
I'm the Open Operations Specialist for the Open.Michigan initiative at the University of Michigan. I'm passionate about collecting, organizing and highlighting U-M produced OER/OCW and open learning experiences.


Thursday October 18, 2012 11:20am - 12:05pm
C400

11:20am

OER for Educational Innovation: How About the Teacher?

To succeed in being a prosperous country, it is important for the Netherlands to remain on the forefront of innovation and knowledge development. One of the key pillars to succeed is to raise the next generation to possess 21st century skills encompassing critical inquiry, problem solving and participating in learning networks. This puts a demand on the teaching and education in being innovative and switch from a teacher centered to a learner centered process. A learner centered approach to education requires, amongst other things, more flexible educational resources. For several years now, more and more schools in secondary education are experimenting with these kinds of educational innovations. In most cases these innovations were enabled by (new) possibilities of current technology.

Most current paper-based textbooks are not designed to support these developments, because of their “one size fits all” approach of the learners, thereby hindering a more personalized teaching process. For teachers this means that they have to create their own learning materials, preferably in a digital format. Although these materials can be created from scratch, teachers increasingly use available open educational resources (OER) to rearrange these in an appropriate and meaningful way. The Wikiwijs initiative, launched in 2009, supports these processes by offering a platform where teachers can find, share, create and rearrange OER. Important conditions for success of these innovations are teachers’ attitudes towards and motivation to create and use digital learning materials and their level of competencies in this field. A considerable part of the population of teachers have little experience in the digital area and need training into it.

To learn more about the competencies in using, creating and rearranging OER and the motivation and attitude towards this, a survey was conducted among all teachers in a school for secondary education in a provincial town in the Netherlands. This school has the ambition to have personalized learning implemented in 2016. They have started a path towards realisation of this goal in 2011. In 2012 a first year will start using tablets with learning materials as much as possible. These materials are both self created and bought from a commercial publisher. The results of this survey will be used to device training modules for the teachers and to implement other lines of interventions to facilitate the implementation of this innovation, specifically in terms of stimulating motivation and supporting positive attitudes of teachers.


Speakers
RS

Robert Schuwer

Professor, Open Universiteit/Fontys University of Applied Sciences


Thursday October 18, 2012 11:20am - 12:05pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

11:20am

EdReady: Personalized OER, Finally

In this session, I will give a preview of EdReady, a new application that is designed to use assessments and other relevant data to drive personalized search and discovery of educational resources, especially OER. We start with what we know about a learner and then use that information to present customized programs of study. There will be a number of key features in EdReady that will be of interest to the OER community: a flexible assessment player, a resource marketplace that places OER on a level playing field, open data outputs for education researchers and policy makers, and APIs for ingesting and serving data at various operational levels across the application.

This application is being built and distributed by the Monterey Institute for Technology and Education (MITE), and the initial release for EdReady is planned for next year and will focus on developmental math, helping students returning to college to be able to take credit-bearing courses. EdReady is not intended to serve as a complete learning management solution, nor to replace instructors and classrooms. Rather, EdReady will improve the likelihood of identifying educational resources and courses of study that are appropriate to that specific learner, thereby driving awareness and use of OER and enabling the personalization of education that has thus far eluded meaningful incorporation into our educational system.


Speakers
avatar for Ahrash Bissell

Ahrash Bissell

EdReady Project Manager, The NROC Project
I'm most passionate about inspiring learning, collaboration, and the pathways to a more just, equitable world. I believe that all things "open" have the potential to foment positive changes in those directions. I currently work for the Monterey Institute for Technology and Education, and have previously worked for Creative Commons, as well as Duke University and other academic institutions, and I have been (and remain in many cases) a... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2012 11:20am - 12:05pm
C485

11:20am

The New Eco System: Open Education Resources and Assessment

This new initiative provides the connection between Open Educational Resources, evaluation and assessment of student learning and academic pathways.


Speakers
JI

John Ittelson

Professor, CSU Monterey Bay


Thursday October 18, 2012 11:20am - 12:05pm
C485

12:05pm

Lunch
Thursday October 18, 2012 12:05pm - 1:30pm
Lobby

1:30pm

The OER Hub

The Open University (OU) is the leading distance education provider in the UK and in addition to serving over 250,000 students at any one time, makes available content from over 600 of its courses as OER. Combined with a dedicated research base in educational technology and the leadership of various OER projects, we are learning from a unique opportunity to bring our expertise and networks together as a coordinated presence to colleagues in the OER community.

Bridge to Success (B2S) is a Next Generation Learning Challenges project whose aim is to prepare adults to successfully and confidently transition to a college environment, to pursue advanced qualifications, or to assist them in gaining employment via the use of OER. Bridging with open content gives the method and tools to address the challenge of transition: from developmental courses to mainstream, from registration to starting study, and from disadvantaged to back on track. We have helped those who have repeatedly struggled with passing courses over years and learners failing to meet entry requirements, who are now starting to understand concepts for the first time. Our starting point was The OU’s ‘Openings’ courses that have been shown to increase learner capability and confidence, encourage participation, result in student registration on accredited courses and contribute to greater progression and completion. B2S set out to take Openings content to a US context, helping students bridge between their experience and the requirements that they face completing the early stages of study and in workforce improvement programmes.

The OER Hub concept was key to bringing together the elements of planning, delivery and research for the Bridge to Success project. The essence of the hub concept is to be a coordinating presence, to provide OER project infrastructure and to be a collaborating mechanism for potential partners and colleagues in the following areas:
•OER practices – the indirect support of learning through expertise in website impact evaluation, usability and accessibility.
•Learning Product and Systems design – OU Learning Design expertise to ensure conversion to OER keeps content pedagogically sound.
•Outreach – extension of curriculum-focused OER beyond formal educational institutions.
•The Evidence Hub – a web-fronted academic database for claims about OER.
•Research – methods for analysing OER.
•Networks – collaboration with Fellows, cross-pollination with global OER projects around research, scalability of content and influencing policy.
•Soft assessment – OER links with badging initiatives and soft accreditation.
•Systems – use of Moodle to host OER content as real courses and the production of multiple formats for learners.

It is these key areas that may be of interest to others working in OER projects as we learn to amplify the good lessons learnt and would like to share practice.


Speakers
avatar for Gary Elliott-Cirigottis

Gary Elliott-Cirigottis

I am the Business Improvement & Programme Manager in the Institute of Educational Technology at the Open University. I have been involved in two OER projects in the Institute -- OLNET and Bridge to Success -- and oversee the work within the Institutes' programmes. I am particularly interested in making the connection across our research activities and implementing them into the University's teaching activity.
PL

Patrina Law

Senior Manager for Strategic Projects, The Open University
My role is to coordinate strategic projects for the Institute of Educational Technology with a particular emphasis on Open Educational Resources (OER) and within this, I currently manage the Gates Foundation 'Bridge to Success' project (b2s.aacc.edu) and am Programme Manager for the Hewlett-funded OER Research Hub. I coordinate the 'OER Hub' for the University, to support best practice in OER projects and to coordinate the combined skills... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

1:30pm

Are there technical barriers to open education?

With an abundance of open educational resources (OER) available from around the globe to use in teaching and learning, a major challenge for those producing materials is to create a healthy OER life-cycle. For open education to flourish, users of OER need to be able to discover them, to be able to use and adapt them, and to share their derivations (Yergler 2010, Hilton III et al 2010). OER are released onto the internet in a scatter-gun approach, some being housed in repositories and others made available thought file sharing websites including YouTube for video or Flickr for photographs, for example. Thus, searching for OERs is time consuming, and additional frustrations also arise because the OER is often in a technical format that cannot be reused or repurposed. OER infrastructure needs to consider technology in terms of hardware, software, connectivity and standards (Downes 2007), and in terms of the ALMS analysis which considers the user’s access to editing tools, technical expertise and whether the original source-files are accessible (Hilton III et al 2010). It is surprising therefore that the literature addressing these questions is sparse. The aim of our research is to explore which OER formats are most open in terms of discover, interoperability, accessibility and adaptability.

We undertook a review of analytical data from three OER project websites the first of which was launched in 2007. Health and life science subject OERs have been shared via the internet by De Montfort University in the UK on a range of subjects including laboratory skills (Virtual Analytical Laboratory) and sickle cell disease (Sickle Cell Open, Online Topics and Educational Resources). Our approach to maximise discovery is to house resources on search engine optimised websites, and to use social networks for distribution. Our approach to providing flexible and editable resources is to publish OER in multiple file formats. For example an Adobe Flash animation “.swf” file are also be published as “.AVI” video file with interactive elements removed. The narrations are released as “.mp3” and transcribed into “.PDF” and “.txt” files, and the whole source code (.fla) is put in a zip file for users who want to repurpose the OER.

By reviewing the website analytical data and social network data we are starting to understand which formats are the most popular for use and re-use, and we can provide technical recommendations to the OER community to ensure the widest audience can benefit from open education and open learning.

Downes S (2006). Models for Sustainable Open Educational Resources. Interdisciplinary Journal of Knowledge and Learning Objects (3), 29-44.

Hilton III, J, Wiley D, Stein J and Johnson A. (2010) The four 'R's of openness and ALMS analysis: Frameworks for open educational resources. Open Learning 25(1), 37–44.

Hylén J (2006). Open educational resources: Opportunities and challenges. Open Education Conference Proceedings. Available: http://www.knowledgeall.com/files/Additional_Readings-Consolidated.pdf

Yergler NR (2010). Search and discovery: OER’s open loop. Open Education Conference Proceedings. Available: http://openaccess.uoc.edu/webapps/o2/bitstream/10609/4852/6/Yergler.pdf



Thursday October 18, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
C485

1:30pm

Establishing inter-rater reliability with the ALMS rubric

The ALMS analysis is a framework to measure the technical difficulty in revising or remixing open educational resources. A rubric has been in development over the past year to break down each component of the rubric into measurable criteria. The results of a test of inter-rater reliability for that rubric will be discussed as well as future iterations of the rubric.


Speakers

Thursday October 18, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
C485

1:30pm

Opening the Dissertation

Opening the Dissertation: Educating Doctoral Students about CC Licensing their Thesis

Defending a dissertation is a signature moment in a scholarly career: it is the transition from apprentice to journeyman. For many graduate students, it represents the first major work that they place under a copyright regime and the basis for their first publications. And yet, few resources exist to guide first-time authors through the copyright process. Most universities guide students towards adopting a standard “All Rights Reserved” copyright license without critically considering alternatives. A tremendous opportunity exists to advance open scholarship by treating this signature event as a “teachable moment” to induct newly minted scholars into the community of advocates for open access and open education.

To advance this discussion, two young scholars from Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society, Justin Reich and Dennis Tenen, have begun a book project to help guide young scholars through choices about copyright and the dissertation. Justin and Dennis were both the first doctoral students in their respective departments at Harvard to license their theses using Creative Commons, and they hope to help make the process easier for future students.

Opening the Dissertation: Why Publishing Your Dissertation under Creative Commons is Good for You and for the World will provide graduate students and their advisors with a concise, readable introduction to the landscape of copyright and publishing. It will present a compelling case for students to license their dissertation under a Creative Commons License and argue that such a decision will have positive consequences both for the writer and for the research community. It will address the critical questions and concerns that scholars face in regards to copyright: Will your work be cited less or more if the dissertation is available online, under the Creative Commons license? Will publishing your work openly make it easier for other to “steal” your ideas? How will a CC license affect opportunities for publishing? By thinking carefully about these questions, Opening the Dissertation will encourage young scholars to be advocates for open access and engagement in the open movement.

This session has three purposes. The first is to provide a brief introduction to the Opening the Dissertation project and give participants an opportunity to critique the project. The second purpose is to solicit contributions for the project: Opening the Dissertation will be an edited volume with both essays about the current state of dissertation publishing and case studies from recent doctoral graduates who have licensed their dissertation openly. Finally, the presenters will engage participants in a broad discussion about advancing the movement for open scholarship and access at the graduate level. We will foster a discussion about common obstacles to openly licensing and publishing theses, and the steps that we can take to induct new scholars and educators into the community of open activists. Ideas from this session will help to build a strategy for engaging doctoral students and advisors around the world about the critical issues of open access and the connection to the symbolic moment of submitting, and Opening, the dissertation.

 


Speakers

Thursday October 18, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

1:30pm

Effective Strategies to Support Large-scale Government OER Programs: Case Studies from Commonwealth of Learning and U.S. Department of Labor TAACCCT Program

Open Policy Strategies and Implementation in the U.S. Department of Labor TAACCCT Grant Program

The unanimous adoption of the 2012 Paris OER Declaration at the UNESCO World Open Educational Resources (OER) Congress heralds a profound change to how publicly funded educational resources may be openly licensed and shared in the coming years.

A small number of large-scale publicly funded OER projects are in process, many more are anticipated worldwide, and effective strategies for managing this policy shift are needed.  In this session we will examine two case studies to learn which strategies are currently being used to support publicly funded OER projects, and discuss what support will be needed to ensure the success of future large OER projects as more governments adopt open policies to require publicly funded resources be openly licensed resources.

Case Study 1:  The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) created the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program to encourage community colleges to create open education and vocational programs for unemployed workers.  It represents one effort to introduce open policies into publicly funded projects by requiring that all materials created or modified with grant / public funds carry a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license to guarantee the resources can be reused, revised, remixed and redistributed.

Recognizing the need for grantees to fully understand these requirements, a private foundation is providing support for an OPEN Consortium (http://open4us.org) to provide consulting and direct technical assistance on open licensing, leveraging existing OER, universal design, accessibility, meta-data tagging, learning analytics, and developing open courseware. The TAConnecT program is another support mechanism that matches grantees with organizations that have expertise in many areas including faculty development of OER, measuring learning outcomes, developmental adult education, career workforce education, and open eLearning platforms.

Case Study 2: The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government to encourage the development and sharing of open learning / distance education knowledge, resources and technologies. COL has a decade-long history of helping developing nations improve access to quality education and training and the Open Schooling Initiative in Sub-Saharan Africa represents a multi-country project to use OER and technology to implement universal access to secondary school education.

Using professional development workshops, educators and policymakers have received training on development and operation of open schools.   Topics have included OER development, instructional design, radio broadcasting, learner support including those with disabilities, eLearning, open school management, strategic planning and quality assurance for open schools.

Attendees will be asked to participate in a discussion of how successful the current support strategies have been and what additional support mechanisms for future large-scale publicly funded OER projects are needed. Feedback from case study leaders will be shared as available.


Speakers
avatar for Una Daly

Una Daly

Director, Community College Outreach, Open Courseware Consortium
I am passionate about expanding access to education through the adoption of open textbooks and open educational resources. As the Community College Outreach Director at the Open Courseware Consortium, I work with faculty and staff at community colleges to create awareness and share best practices for finding, creating, and remixing open educational resources to improve teaching and learning for all learners.
FF

Frances Ferreira

Education Specialist for Open Schooling Initiative at Commonwealth of Learning
avatar for Cable Green

Cable Green

Dr. Cable Green is the Director of Global Learning for Creative Commons. Cable works with the global open community to leverage open licensing, open content, open policies, and the affordances of digital things to significantly improve access to quality, affordable, education and research resources so everyone in the world can attain all the education they desire. His career is dedicated to increasing access to educational opportunity for... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
C400

1:30pm

Examining the impact of Open Course Library materials on teaching practice and student success

The purpose of this session is to present research that investigates the adoption of Open Course Library (OCL) courses within the WA CTC system. The Open Course Library project aims to create fully developed course content for 81 high enrollment courses in the Washington State Community and Technical College system. These materials will then be shared with an open license. The OCL project successfully developed 42 high quality courses through a year-long collaboration among 125 experts. On October 31, 2011, the first 42 courses were released as scheduled, and made available to stakeholders through multiple channels.
The immediate impact of the first 42 courses was significant. Within the first few months after its release, over 30,000 people from 125 different countries have visited opencourselibrary.org. But the most prominent result was its impact on lowering students’ textbook costs. The Student PIRGS estimated that the 42 faculty course developers and their departments will save students $1.26 million during the 2011-2012 school year, which alone exceeds the $1.18 million spent on creating the courses. These savings not only help Washington’s students afford a college education, but also provide a tremendous return on the original investment.
While the immediate impact on lowering students’ textbook costs was significant, it is unclear how OCL courses have been adopted within the WA CTC system, and how the adoption has influenced faculty’s teaching practices and student success. Our research focuses on faculty’s use of OCL materials to meet their professional needs, their perception and readiness of using OCL materials, and ultimately its influence on student success. Specifically, we seek to address the following questions:
•What are the barriers to the successful adoption of open course materials?
•What are the keys to the successful adoption of open course materials?
•What institutional policies are needed to support the adoption and use of open course
•materials?
•How and to what extent, are open course materials being shared and used?
•How does the use of open course materials influence student success?
The study is currently underway. The participants of this study include faculty working for Washington community college system. A mixed methods approach (a procedure for collecting, analyzing and mixing or integrating both quantitative and qualitative data at various stages of the research process within a single study) will be used. Data collection consists primarily of survey, and phone interviews using a semi-structured interview protocol that was designed to capture faculty’s perception on the use of the OCL materials and other open educational materials. Cross-interview analyses will be conducted for each question in the interview guide.
While the study focuses on specific open educational materials, we anticipate that this study will shed light on the usefulness of the system to faculty and students. Additionally, we believe that we will gain insights on how to keep OCL course materials evolving, and hence increase sustainability.


Speakers
TC

Tom Caswell

Tom Caswell is Open Education Policy Associate at the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC). Tom’s current projects include running the Open Course Library, piloting a community college Open Learning Initiative (OLI) in Washington, and supporting the OPEN initiativefor Department of Labor C3T grantees.
avatar for Boyoung Chae

Boyoung Chae

Policy Associate, eLearning & Open Education, Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges


Thursday October 18, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
C400

2:15pm

Break
Thursday October 18, 2012 2:15pm - 2:30pm
Lobby

2:30pm

Project Kaleidoscope: Institutional Adoption Models for OER

Kaleidoscope brings together institutions that seek to improve student success through the adoption, measurement and improvement of OER courses. In this session, senior academic leaders from the colleges will share their experiences and approaches to lead and support faculty through a process to adopt OER.

The presenters will also share experiences from developing and using a cross-institutional, community-based process to discover, adopt, and sustain OER courses.

Finally, they will present the results from the program and share their plans to improve and expand their collaboration.


Speakers
avatar for Kim Thanos

Kim Thanos

Founder and CEO, Lumen
Connecting people, organizations, content and technology to improve success of at-risk students.


Thursday October 18, 2012 2:30pm - 3:15pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

2:30pm

The Kaleidoscope Faculty Experience: Collaborative Adoption of OER

In one year, faculty members from eight colleges partnered to create, deliver, measure and enhance OER course designs for over 9,000. The students found the OER to be of equal or higher quality than materials for other courses. They were more likely to succeed and more likely to persist.

Faculty from four different colleges and four different disciplines will share their experience in participating in the collaborative course redesign process. They will share the approach they used, the resources they discovered, and their process for improving the courses over time.

They will also share their personal experiences and recommendations in engaging in the open education community.


Speakers
avatar for Amber Gilewski

Amber Gilewski

Associate Professor of Psychology, Tompkins Cortland Community College
Veganism, environmentalism, animal rights, human rights, feminism, social justice, the democratization of education, open content, and comic relief.
HM

Howard Miller

Chair, Dept. of Secondary Education, Mercy College
After nearly 40 years in the field of education, I remain passionate about improving the quality of teaching and learning, and certainly OER has opened new and exciting opportunities. Here's a link to an article I co-authored on the impact of OER at Mercy College--http://tinyurl.com/n6kru53 Also, we are looking for proposals for articles on OER for an upcoming issue of the Global Education Review. Contact me at hmiller@mercy.edu | | Beyond... Read More →
RD

Ronda Dorsey Neugebauer

Faculty Success Lead, Lumen Learning
My last 10 years in education have focused on improving at-risk students’ academic success. I'm passionate about collaborating with others to create, experience, and sustain teaching and learning success using OER.
avatar for Kim Thanos

Kim Thanos

Founder and CEO, Lumen
Connecting people, organizations, content and technology to improve success of at-risk students.


Thursday October 18, 2012 2:30pm - 3:15pm
C680 - HSBC Hall

2:30pm

Coventry Open Media

Recently, the Media Department at Coventry School of Art and Design, UK, has launched four open media classes, all of which are freely available online (http://openmediaclasses.covmedia.co.uk/). These classes are open to anyone, to participate in, contribute discussion to, and even rip, remix and mash-up. This applies to the schedule, lectures/lesson contents, resources and assignments, online talks, interviews with visiting speakers and a number of practical ‘how to’ videos - all available under a CC-BY-SA license.
Each of our panel presentations includes a ‘walk-through’ of the OER sites featured, and each has a dedicated feedback space that has been opened for the conference.
1: Photography - Jonathan Worth
Photography and Narrative (http://www.phonar.org) and Picturing the Body (http://www.picbod.org) are our longest-standing open classes. After featuring in Wired magazine (http://www.wired.com/rawfile/2011/08/free-online-class-shakes-up-photo-education/), where they were described as ‘shaking up education’, approx. 1,000 people signed-up in the following week to join the classes. 29,000 people from 1,632 cities in 107 countries have passed through these classes since Sept. 2011, helping to make BA Photography one of the most over-subscribed in the University.  Now we can evaluate  our model for enabling academics, students and practitioners - both inside and outside the university - to collaboratively produce, curate and engage with diverse media and educational resources relating to photography.
2: Creative Activism – Pete Woodbridge
Creative Activism (http://www.creativeactivism.net/), the most recent of the four Open Media classes, explores the potential of creative media activism by encouraging the participants to experiment in creating ‘live’ media interventions - becoming involved in a number of crucial cultural, political and social debates (e.g. Human rights, Occupy and student protests). This class enables students to develop their skills in creating media to advocate a cause, make a case, or address an injustice; using our ‘open’ approach to encourage students to make their work visible beyond the classroom environment and to collaborate with and participate in external networks and organisations.
3: Open Media: the Philosophy – Shaun Hides
After presenting case studies of the classes in photography and creative activism, this panel provides an overview of the Open Media philosophy which underpins our original approach to Open Education. This strategy - currently a ‘live’ experiment - has been developed to address, head-on, some of the challenges faced by HE in the 21st century: significance/engagement for students, the search for new sustainable practices and economies, becoming visible amidst the crowd, trust in communities, and devising novel, relevant pedagogies.
4: Open Media: the Future – Jonathan Shaw
The panel concludes with a presentation linking together our recent and future uses of diverse tools and platforms– e.g. Blogs, Vimeo, Flicker, Abode DPS, iBooks,and Apps, to share and disseminate our research and educational materials. For example, Living Books About Life (http://www.livingbooksaboutlife.org/) produced twenty one OER books about life in just 7 months; while Photographic Mediations (http://itunes.apple.com/gb/itunes-u/photographic-mediations/id385898860), originally a small day-long symposium with c.50 attendees, has now been listened to nearly1,000,000 times via iTunesU. Finally, we outline some novel ways we are exploring new media and publishing platforms, and establishing new collaborations.


Speakers
JS

Jonathan Shaw

Coventry University
Jonathan Shaw is an award winning photographer and educator based in the UK. His work has been published alongside photographic pioneers such as Eadweard Muybridge and Harold Edgerton. Jonathan’s photographic practice has been described as being part of an early generation of artists responsible for the emergence of a new school of photography which blurs the boundaries between the still and moving image. | | As an educator within... Read More →
avatar for Peter Woodbridge

Peter Woodbridge

Filmmaker, Digital Producer and Open Education advocate interested in opening up Universities to help shape collaborative forms of cultural production and education. I've been involved in a range of open projects, including setting thousands of resources free through platform, app, publishing and open course development projects.


Thursday October 18, 2012 2:30pm - 3:15pm
C485

2:30pm

Open Educational Resources and Practices as a Driver for Change in Art College Education

This session will describe the work ((http://alto.arts.ac.uk/) of the Centre for Learning and Teaching in Art and Design (CLTAD) at the University of the Arts London that has been helping teaching professionals engage with Open Educational Resources and Practices (OER/P). Our experience indicates that these activities are potentially powerful tools to support those who are interested in promoting, understanding and managing change in an educational system. As UK higher education enters a prolonged period of austerity and a rapidly changing student demographic, the question of what and how to change is becoming more pressing. Increasingly, colleges are considering offering new flexible learning opportunities as means to retain and extend their student markets. This in turn raises questions about the institutional changes needed to support such activities and the individual pedagogic skills required to develop new programmes of learning and modes of teaching.

We have found that OER/P acts as an excellent ‘lightening conductor’ to identify underlying pedagogic conceptions and practices. As John Biggs, Paul Ramsden and others have observed everyone has an implicit model of learning and teaching. Making these mental models explicit using OER/P is an important step in developing the skills and infrastructures needed to operate effectively in these new educational markets. This helps to move engagement with OER/P from the edges of institutional agendas to the centre of strategic planning. We outline the main strategic dimensions in which change needs to occur in art college education, concentrating on the, very personal, area of pedagogic design and practice.

Pedagogic methods in art education place an emphasis on dialogue, mentoring, apprenticeship and a learning community approach to personal development and support. This is a potentially strong foundation to support open innovation. However, as in much of the rest of higher education, one of the main obstacles to moving teaching practice towards a more open model is the highly situated nature of institutional teaching; the ‘pedagogy of the studio and workshop’. Such teaching activities are strongly embedded in an institutional context, almost in the 'bricks and mortar' of the institution. Not surprisingly, in this environment teachers can find it difficult to conceptualise and abstract their own pedagogic practice.

The critical nature of the design processes that are required to effectively implement flexible learning make the acquisition of collaborative pedagogic design skills a key area to address. In this connection, there is much to be learnt from those fields of professional activity where design is recognised as a fundamental component.

This session will provide an overview of some of our activities in supporting teachers engage with OER/P together with their reflections on the experience, paying particular attention to the affective, administrative, and cognitive factors involved. The session will end with time for participants to consider and debate the implications of the support teachers may need to engage in these new design practices.


Speakers
avatar for john casey

john casey

Open Education Project Manager, University of the Arts London
Managing Open Ed Projects at the UAL. Interested in how Open Ed can drive change in 'closed' education. Also very interested in the design skills needed for Open Ed as a bridge to introducing more flexible learning in traditional education,
avatar for Nancy K Turner (University of Saskatchewan)

Nancy K Turner (University of Saskatchewan)

Director, Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching Effectiveness, University of Saskatchewan


Thursday October 18, 2012 2:30pm - 3:15pm
C485

2:30pm

Answering the questions of openness

Practitioners considering using Open Educational Resources (OER) seek (i) the evidence that openness works, and (ii) models of openness which may be followed. The desire for evidence and guidance reflects the challenges faced by any new area of learning technology, but is particularly timely for OER as the potential to move to the mainstream is made increasingly obvious through major initiatives and high profile launches. Research across a range of activities involving themed research strands, studies and gathering of data has shown that there are models that we can follow and shared questions that need answers. Taking a reconstructive approach to existing research, we present a set of critical factors that emerge, each of which links to activity within the community and requirements from practitioners, and we show examples that provide possible answers.

There is a need for open education and its advocates to encourage mutual sharing of data in support of the objectives of the movement as a whole. Openness in education can be disruptive to existing pedagogical and business models. By piecing together data from a range of educational contexts both formal (K12, college, higher education) and informal (repositories, MOOCs, open online courses) we can assess the impact that different initiatives have had and plan for future learning from experience in each sector. A hybrid research and practice framework combines applying research findings to help make progress while at the same time seeking to further build up those findings and exemplars. By working with organisations from the open education movement from around the world to collate and analyse evidence of OER use we can start to build scalable frameworks for open solutions that are tailored to a variety of contexts. Thus, on the basis of data from the OLnet OER Evidence Hub, we argue that the way forward is to value partial pieces of evidence while clarifying their basis and appreciating the contexts in which they can apply; we can then help new projects and initiatives to make good choices as they work with Open Educational Resources and Open Educational Practices. This should be understood as an active and open process of extending and refining our knowledge about what works and why. The emerging picture suggests that some of the standard issues of OER – quality, sustainability, reuse – should not be thought of as OER issues per se, while remaining challenges can be divided into three categories: challenges of preparation; research challenges and emergent challenges (see http://www.open.ac.uk/blogs/openminded/?p=523 for graphic).

In this presentation we will show the summarised challenges, map these across initiatives and pick out key exemplars selected from cases where we have had OLnet research or Fellowship connections such as in copyright solutions to influence policy of Creative Commons, access approach of TESSA, cultural work within UNESCO, and assessment and social interaction of P2PU. Collation of individual evidence offers the potential to see generic answers. We will invite interactive discussion and be prepared to match individual problems to potential solutions, or, perhaps, as new issues to be investigated.


Speakers
avatar for Rob Farrow

Rob Farrow

Research Fellow, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror | | Project URLS: | http://oerhub.net/ | https://oerworldmap.org/ | http://go-gn.net/ | http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/


Thursday October 18, 2012 2:30pm - 3:15pm
C400

2:30pm

State of Openness @ Higher Education in the Netherlands

In the Netherlands, 14 research universities and 41 universities of applied sciences offer Bachelor’s, Master’s and PhD degree programs. The Dutch education system is known for the excellent quality of its teaching and research and its international academic environment.
In 2009 the Dutch Ministry of Education launched Wikiwijs, an OER platform. The goal is to give teachers in all educational sectors (from K-12 to higher education) a means of finding, sharing, creating and reusing OER. In 2011, SURF (the initiator of innovation in higher education and research) launched the nationwide Open Educational Resources Program. Its aim is to increase awareness of OER in Dutch higher education, to help higher education institutions develop a strategic approach to OER, and to advance the development and use/reuse of OER. In SURF’s Strategic Plan the Dutch higher education institutions have made the theme of “openness” a priority for the coming years, in both education and research.
In 2011, all these measures resulted in an increase in OER activities at several institutions. It remained unclear, however, which of the institutions had a clearly defined vision of OER that would result in an OER policy and progress in implementing that policy.
To define “the state of openness” in Dutch higher education, SURF and Wikiwijs conducted a survey in spring 2012. The survey’s aim was to answer the following key questions: To what extent do Dutch educational institutions have a policy on developing, sharing and using/reusing OER?, and (2) which OER are already available in Dutch higher education (or have the potential to become so)? The survey thus offers a glimpse of “the state of the art”, the purpose being to understand the extent to which OER have been implemented in Dutch higher education, in both the quantitative and qualitative sense.
The presentation will provide more details about the survey, its results and the subsequent actions.


Speakers
avatar for Hester Jelgerhuis

Hester Jelgerhuis

Project Manager Open Educational Resources Programme, SURF
RS

Robert Schuwer

Professor, Open Universiteit/Fontys University of Applied Sciences


Thursday October 18, 2012 2:30pm - 3:15pm
C400

3:15pm

Closing Remarks - Remixathon Results!
Speakers
SL

Scott Leslie

Creating an alternate reality since 1969
avatar for Paul Stacey

Paul Stacey

Associate Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons
I live just outside Vancouver Canada and work on Creative Common's global open education and open business models initiatives. I like ping pong, cycling, art, food, and drink - count me in on parties.


Thursday October 18, 2012 3:15pm - 3:30pm
C300